About Allyson Pollock

Allyson Pollock is professor of public health policy and research at Queen Mary, University of London and was previously Director of the Centre for International Public Health Policy at the University of Edinburgh. She is a leading authority on public health and the implications of privatisation for public services, and the author of NHS plc, on the privatisation of our health care under New Labour.

Articles by Allyson Pollock

This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

Opting out of care.data is not the answer

Mistrust of care.data is not surprising, given the corporate interests involved - but simply opting out will make it even harder to monitor the impact of privatisation on Britain's health.

Why we need a political campaign to reinstate the NHS in England

This extract is from the forthcoming publication on the future of the national health service for the Centre for Labour and Social Studies (Class)

Briefing paper - the NHS reinstatement bill

An explanation of what David Owen's new bill is trying to achieve and why it is needed

‘Commercial confidentiality’ trumps public right to know in England’s new health market

In the new competitive market for healthcare created by the Health and Social Care Bill it will become increasingly difficult to know what exactly is being done with public money. 

The end of the NHS as we know it

"How the Health and Social Care Bill 2011 would end entitlement to comprehensive health care in England" republished from The Lancet with thanks.

The abolition of the NHS. That’s what is happening.

In unscripted remarks, the UK Prime Minister revealed his true agenda: he wants to turn our universal health care system into “a fantastic business”. Not patient choice but choice of patient will be the order of the day.

An end to Bevan’s dream of free healthcare for all Britons?

If the Health and Social Care Bill is passed without major amendments it will forever be known as the “abolishing the NHS” Bill. Make no mistake, the NHS will be there but in name only: health services will be run on US lines by, and largely for, shareholders and profit, while denial of care will escalate.
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