About Kagbe Rachel

Kagbe Rachel is from Chad where she has worked as a freelance journalist for seven years. Her articles cover subjects linked to education, women’s rights and health. She currently works full time for a Chadian company as a communications manager. She has previously worked with women’s community groups and anti-malaria initiatives.

 

Articles by Kagbe Rachel

This week's editor

AdamWidth95.jpg

Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

“Kind sirs, stop beating your wives!”

Day-to-day, Chadian women are beaten, humiliated and crushed beneath the weight of traditions. However, women were not predestined to be their husbands’ punch-bags, says Kagbe Rachel. Chadian women must be treated with dignity and respect. 

Chers messieurs, arrêtez de battre vos femmes!

Quotidiennement les femmes tchadiennes sont battues, humiliées et écrasées sous le poids de traditions. Pourtant la femme n’était pas prédestinée à être le sac de frappe de son mari. Il faut que la femme tchadienne soit traitée avec dignité et respect, dit Kagbe Rachel.

Le système éducatif tchadien en pleine décadence

91% de recalés à l’examen du baccalauréat 2012 au Tchad pour seulement 9% d’admis. Réorganiser le baccalauréat n’est pas la solution. Il faut revoir le système éducatif et sensibiliser les différents acteurs à une prise de conscience.

Education in Chad: in a state of decline

This year in Chad only 9% of students passed their high school leaving exams. Reorganising these exams is not the solution. We need to re-examine the whole education system, encouraging all those involved to wake up and take stock, says Kagbe Rachel.

Wasted lives: why do Chadian women still die in childbirth?

Government attempts to reduce the excruciatingly high maternal mortality and stillbirth rates in Chad are failing. Qualified medical staff paid reasonable salaries and health auxiliaries are needed, not infrastructure, says Kagbe Rachel

Vies gâchées : Pourquoi les tchadiennes meurent-elles encore en couche?

Les efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour réduire les taux catastrophiquement élevés de mortalité maternelle et de mortinatalité au Chad ont été mal orientés. Ce dont nous avons besoin, ce n’est pas la construction d’infrastructures, mais de médecins spécialistes qui reçoivent un salaire décent et d’auxiliaires de santé, dit Kagbe Rachel. 

Syndicate content