About Mary Dejevsky

Mary Dejevsky is a columnist and chief editorial writer for the Independent.

Articles by Mary Dejevsky

This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

An accusation too far

Last Thursday, Pavel Stroilov presented a piece that alleged I had been paid to publish articles in the Independent, and that I published on the instructions of its owner. Nothing could be further from the truth, writes Mary Dejevsky.

Don't get me wrong, Mr Travin!

Mary Dejevsky was surprised when her enthusiastic profile of St. Petersburg governor Valentina Matviyenko in Britain’s The Independent newspaper elicited strong criticism from Russia’s blogosphere. Dmitri Travin’s response on openDemocracy Russia questioned her knowledge of the Russian political scene. Dejevsky's answer to his criticisms is that Russians should beware of reading Western reports through the prism of their own experience.

How to help Russia’s democrats?

Russia's democracy activists are surely an unimpeachable cause, deserving all the moral and financial support they can get. They face all manner of obstacles.

Mary Dejevsky is a columnist and chief editorial writer for the Independent.

Also by Mary Dejevsky in openDemocracy:

"The west gets Putin wrong" (2 March 2005)

"Kyrgyzstan questions" (30 March 2005)

"Germany's travesty of democracy" (10 October 2005)

"Russia's NGO law: the wrong target" (15 December 2005)

"The new class society" (22 February 2006)

"Russia: what demographic crisis?" (27 September 2006)

"After Putin..." (21 September 2007)
Western observers know, and not just from the parliamentary and presidential elections of December 2007 and March 2008, that for opposition politicians access to the establishment media is nigh impossible. As for street protests, forget it. If the likes of Mikhail Kasyanov or Garry Kasparov try to organise a march, the Kremlin ranges a completely disproportionate show of force against them. Outspoken Russian journalists have been murdered or otherwise silenced. And people in the west instinctively dislike Russia's restrictions on foreign NGOs (the country's NGO law of 2006 may have helped to make the British Council's operation in Russia vulnerable).

After Putin...

A chill can be felt in Moscow, and it is not just the early arrival of autumn. After months of convincing themselves that it is not going to happen, Russians are coming to grips with the certainty - in so far as anything in their country is certain - that, when the snow starts to melt in spring 2008 they will have a new president. Vladimir Putin, their surrogate Tsar for the past eight years, will no longer be master of the Kremlin.

Mary Dejevsky is a columnist and chief editorial writer for the Independent.

Also by Mary Dejevsky in openDemocracy:

"The west gets Putin wrong" (2 March 2005)

"Kyrgyzstan questions"(30 March 2005)

"Germany's travesty of democracy"(10 October 2005)

"Russia's NGO law: the wrong target" (15 December 2005)

"The new class society"(22 February 2006)

"Russia: what demographic crisis?" (27 September 2006)

Russia: what demographic crisis?

A Soviet-era perspective suggests to Mary Dejevsky that Russia’s current population trends offer grounds for optimism.

The new class society

It is 10am or thereabouts on a Sunday morning at Heathrow airport, west London, terminal 3.

Whole clans are on the move: fraught families, overladen trolleys, enormous piles of luggage, and the queues, the interminable queues, just to check in.

Russia's NGO law: the wrong target

The fury of western human-rights groups over Russia’s law regulating NGOs is hypocritical, says Mary Dejevsky.

Germany's travesty of democracy

Gerhard Schröder lost the German election but spent the next three weeks refusing to stand aside. A democratic scandal, says Mary Dejevsky.

Kyrgyzstan questions

What happened in Kyrgyzstan – riot, revolution, conspiracy, geopolitical game? Mary Dejevsky, in Bishkek, probes a central Asian mystery.

The west gets Putin wrong

Is Russia’s problem its president’s strength or his weakness? Mary Dejevsky on the costs of misunderstanding Vladimir Putin.
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