About Neal Ascherson

Neal Ascherson is a journalist and writer. For many years he was foreign correspondent and then columnist for the (London) Observer. Among his books are The King Incorporated: Leopold the Second and the Congo (1963; Granta, 1999); The Struggles for Poland (Random House, 1988); Black Sea (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 1996); and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland (Granta, 2003)

Articles by Neal Ascherson

This week's guest editors

A British letter to France: vote for Europe

There is much talk in Britain of the advantages of a “no” to the European Constitution in the French referendum on May 29. Many suggest a rejection would be fortunate for Tony Blair, suddenly freed from the embarrassment of a British referendum which could turn out to be a dismal humiliation. To ask, and worry about, what it may mean for the wider picture is regarded as unsophisticated.

Pope John Paul II and democracy

In his long life, the Polish pope, Karol Wojtyła, was at the forefront of the struggle for liberty. But in his twenty-six years at the Vatican, where did this towering figure stand on democracy? The distinguished writer Neal Ascherson dissects an ambiguous legacy.

From multiculturalism to where?

The concept of multiculturalism, and the policies that stem from it, have played an important role in displacing the imperial ideal of assimilation, but in its fatal linkage with hard notions of ethnicity it is deeply conservative and increasingly obsolete. The challenge now is to develop a “post-hybridity” politics based on common human nature.
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