About Henry Porter

Henry Porter is a novelist, columnist for the Observer and London Editor of Vanity Fair

Articles by Henry Porter

This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

The Parthenon Sculptures: It's about liberty, too

The Parthenon Marbles (or 'Elgin Marbles') were sculpted in Greece in 447–438 BC, and stolen from there by Lord Elgin in the early 19th century. They are kept in the British Museum. This is a speech recently given by Henry Porter, at an event calling for their return.

What is the point of the Liberal Democrats if they don't stop secret justice?

The denizens of the British State want to prevent their activities being judged in open court and will undermine a fundamental principle of the rule of law to have their way. If the Liberal Democrat leadership does not stop them there is no point in their party's existence.

Riot fever: how could this happen in our country?

Mass disturbances across England last week has left Britain in shock. We thought we understood our society; nothing led us to believe we were on the edge of mayhem.

Keeping an eye on liberty: Let's try not to upstage each other

In this response to George Monbiot on the Freedom Bill, Henry Porter defends his position on liberty. He agrees with Monbiot that the bill has failed to guarantee the right to demonstrate peacefully or freedom of speech for protesters. But argues against Monbiot's assertion that he has been gulled by Nick Clegg's promises.

Surveillance does not make us safe

The UK is one of the most surveilled societies in the world along with North Korea. Is it all about solving crime? No, it is about securing the state's control and crushing individual self-respect

What price liberty?

Henry Porter gives his account of Saturday's What price liberty? debate in Cornwall blogged on OurKingdom last week by organiser Jessica Mann.

A sacred duty

What follows is a speech given by Henry Porter at the Lib Dem Conference Rally in Bournemouth, 13 Sept 2008.

On my return from holiday, at the beginning of this month, I was greeted by about 70 emails sent by my researcher. They were press clippings, excerpts from government papers and links to websites, all of them about some aspect of the attack on liberty. I sat down and went through them and truly I felt I was reading the obituary for our free society.

Absorbing so much at once has a distorting effect - we are not quite there, but we have only a very little time: very little time to save ourselves from the database state. I estimate that in two or three years it will be too late.

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