This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

China’s leftover women: an interview with Leta Hong Fincher

Chinese women face a resurgent crisis of gender inequality, argues Leta Hong Fincher in her new book Leftover Women. She talks to openDemocracy about the future of feminism under socialist neoliberalism.

Understanding the Chinese Communist Party: a conversation with Yu Keping

The challenges of changing a revolutionary party into a ruling party, as seen by no new Martin Luther, but a modernist.

Sex workers in democratic societies

While there are certainly gendered imbalances in the actual structures of current sex markets, these imbalances are created, reinforced and strengthened not by sex work itself but by laws criminalizing sex work and by treating sex workers as second-class citizens without rights.

Taiwan’s students are resisting a Hong Kong-style future

Hong Kong has long been seen as the testing ground for peaceful absorption of a democratic territory into the People’s Republic of China.

Striking behaviour: Chinese workers discover a weapon against labour-market turmoil

In theory, workers in China are promised security through official trade union representation and the rule of the Communist Party. In practice, confronted with the endless churning of a globalised labour market, they are increasingly voting with their feet.

Ukraine and Eurasia's imperial fault-lines

The current conflict has been brewing for a long time and is the result of two asymmetrical imperialisms: Russia's outdated, and rather formal, imperialism, on the one hand, and the west's smart, informal route to empire on the other. We must come to grips with these fault-lines in Eurasia's vast plateau.

Kashgar's redevelopment is about more than anti-Uyghur sentiment

While the CCP’s motives for redeveloping Xinjiang's capital are manifold, what seems to be provoking the most anger among residents, is the near total absence of Uyghur presence in decision-making.

India: jostling for geopolitical control in Afghanistan

Forecasts past the withdrawal of US and British forces in Afghanistan tend to prize fears of violence and instability spilling over into Pakistan, obscuring the country's vital importance to both India and China. 

China, between self and society

The need for an ethical vision to hold society together saw China's former premier Wen Jiabao look to Adam Smith. What does this reveal about the elite's thinking, asks Kerry Brown.

Beyond the Kunming attack

The recent attacks on Kunming train station represent a watershed moment in China-Uyghur relations, as Uyghurs across China face widespread recriminations.

Why Obama shouldn’t fall for Putin’s Ukrainian folly

Russia and the west have conspired to tear the country apart. Both sides must stand down now or face the consequences.

The BRICS of collapse? Why emerging economies need a different development model

They have pursued GDP growth with little or no investment in human, social and natural capital. This does not bode well for the future of the world economy.

Contemporary challenges in medicines access

One of the most recent advances has been to successfully advocate for the adoption of a Socially-Responsible Licensing policy on intellectual property (including therapeutic agents) developed by University College London, the latest in a series of public research institutions to do so.

China vs Facebook: intimate rivals

The Chinese state and the United States company are engaged in an epic if undeclared contest over control and wealth-creation, says Kerry Brown.

Uyghur rights and China

The situation of the Uyghur minority in north-west China became even more precarious in 2013, says Henryk Szadziewski.

After the party: an interview with Wang Hui

The luminary of China’s emergent “New Left” speaks to openDemocracy about the lessons of labour unrest, the Cultural Revolution as taboo, and post-party politics.

An artist’s duty: an interview with Ai Weiwei

Still denied his passport after nearly three years, Ai Weiwei exists in a strange purgatory. In this exclusive openDemocracy interview, the dissident Chinese artist speaks truth to power, as China’s exploitative processes of development demand great responsibility from the nation’s intellectual and artistic currents. Interview.

China and the Great Game

Almost all discussion of Afghanistan after 2014 hinges on the withdrawal of western forces. Yet into that gap a major power is stepping—China. China’s involvement in turn poses major questions, vis-à-vis Pakistan, India and their own point of friction—Kashmir.

China's visitor: Cameron in Beijing

The British prime minister's trip to China was presented as a mission to expand trade links with an important partner. But whose interests was he really representing, asks Kerry Brown.

Internationalizing rights-based resistance in China: the UN Human Rights Council and the citizen

Chinese activists are gradually strengthening the framing of domestic grievances with the vocabulary of international human rights, marking a departure from locality-specific episodes of contention.

Climate leadership in the developing world

There is a level of political dynamism at the national level that seems all but absent from global negotiations. But what is particularly interesting about this growing trend is that it appears to be strongest in the developing world.

China: who is in charge?

China's policy incoherence has disturbing echoes of the prelude to Europe's great war in 1914, says Kerry Brown.

Justice in China: common ground to discuss rights

As Xiaoyu Pu says, human rights is no longer a taboo issue in China; justice never was. Discussing justice allows us to talk about the sort of issues that the rights discourse was meant to grapple with, but in a way which steers clear of cultural and value issues.

A sea of dissent: nonviolent waves in China

What are the lasting sources of discontent that are driving an increase in protest? What tactics are Chinese activists employing and how have nonviolent actors adapted in the face of severe government persecution?

Wild ghosts: Bo Xilai on trial

The trial of the disgraced Chinese politician is hurtling towards its predictable conclusion. But a spectre still haunts the Party, and all those at play in China’s political life. It is the spectre of the Cultural Revolution.

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