This week's editor

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Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

Longing for democracy in Spain

The death of Adolfo Suárez, the first democratic PM of post-Franco Spain, at the age of 81, has reminded a depressed and disenchanted Spanish society that there was once a moment when they prevailed over the odds of history.

Spain and Catalonia: an Iberian dilemma

PM Mariano Rajoy has refused even to acknowledge the possibility of a Catalan referendum on independence. Does he realise that his options to save the integrity of the Spanish state are dwindling?

There's a very different idea of politics and democracy forming in my head

There's a very different idea of politics and democracy forming in my head than the one in the school textbooks. Read more from our You Tell Us bloggers on the topic of apathy in Europe.

Spain’s Marches of Dignity, 22M, 2014: not anti-politics

The marches continue the collective resistance that has galvanized Spanish civil society since the 15-M occupation of the Puerta del Sol, but which is rooted in a long tradition and practice of autonomous politics of resistance and civil disobedience in Madrid and around Spain over the past decades. 

The Madrid blasts, ten years later

In the tenth anniversary of the attack on Madrid’s rail network, Diego Muro analyses the consequences of the blasts for both the European Union and Spain. "Europe’s 9/11", he says, contributed to the decline of the Basque group ETA and to the creation of new mechanisms of coordination and cooperation at the European level.

In the Spanish exclave of Ceuta, the bloody realities of 'Fortress Europe' become apparent

On February 6th, fifteen migrants died while trying to enter the Spanish exclave of Ceuta in North Africa. The Spanish border guards, with their notorious and lethal "push-back" tactics, are largely to blame. Read more from our You Tell Us bloggers.

European austerity seeds governance alternatives

‘If representative democracy is only to choose every four, or five, or six years the person who’s going to do everything they want without taking popular will into account... we are in a sort of trap and I think that’s certainly the case today for Europe and elsewhere.’

Victims no longer: Spain’s anti-eviction movement

For over four years, the Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca (PAH) have responded to a national housing crisis through grassroots organising and direct action. To this day the movement has prevented over 800 evictions across the country. Here Carlos Delclós interviews PAH activist Elvi Mármol.

Snowden and state surveillance in Spain

Like most Europeans, Spaniards were shocked by revelations of extensive US spying on European citizens. Yet, there has been little or no public debate on state surveillance in Spain since then. Why not? (from our new Joining the dots series)

Trapped in the Eurozone - the deep nature of Spain's economic woes

The logic behind tax avoidance is the lack of trust. If you do not trust your fellow countrymen (and particularly the state) and think they will cheat on their taxes, then there is no point in you paying at all.

European court ruling may be stealth incentive for ETA’s disbanding

A controversial European court decision requires the Spanish government to grant early release to jailed terrorists. Will it be secretly glad to have a pretext for doing so?

A Moroccan view on Catalan independence

Madrid's continued support for the independence movement in the Western Sahara is hypocritical when compared with their attitude towards independence movements closer to home.

Cities in the future of democracy

Today’s cities perch people far off the ground. They block sight of the stars. So we’re faced with a completely different task: re-embedding our cities into our biosphere. Interview.

Spain: national television, government tool?

The Spanish government's  determination to manipulate public television and treat viewers as idiots is backfiring. Liz Cooper reports on the response of the private sector, backed by social networks and free press

The legacy of the indignados

Much has been written about the indignados, what was new about them and what is, or will be, their legacy. It is time to acknowledge that the indignados have redefined how – and where! – we engage in politics.

Morocco-Spain relations: A new found love

The history of Spanish–Moroccan relations has been defined as one of mutual interests and guarded suspicion. However, Spain’s economic woes and Morocco’s diplomatic needs have led to a marriage of convenience between the two nations.

How to be a rogue superpower

It hardly matters under what label - including American “safety” and “security” - such a governing power is built; sooner or later, the architecture will determine the acts, and it will become more tyrannical at home and more extreme abroad.  Thank your lucky stars that Edward Snowden made the choices he did.

Mount Zion: the city within

Rather than submit to the noxious dynamics of Spain’s colossal underground economy, the migrant workers of Mount Zion built an informal city in the backdrop of 'brand' Barcelona. On the 24th July the community was forcibly evicted and a humanitarian crisis was born.

Populism, anti-populism and European democracy: a view from the South

Isn’t it time to start dissecting the extremism of this ‘moderate centre’? Is it not the duty of every truly moderate citizen/social scientist, of every democrat, to radically oppose this extremism camouflaged as moderation? 

Spain: ruled by habit?

Anger amongst the Spanish electorate is rising fast amidst the dramatic events in a long-running corruption case implicating the Spanish Government. Liz Cooper says that above all the Spanish want stability, but where stability lies is now uncertain...

Why European air space was closed to the Bolivian President

While European leaders have expressed outrage about the US eavesdropping on the communications of its citizens, for them to symbolically challenge the US is one thing; to challenge it substantively is another thing altogether.

Turns of the century

Instead of experiencing a proliferation of terrorism, we are witnesses to a proliferation of resistance against the standard economic model of the last sixty years. It’s an endogenous shock, not an exogenous one. The socio-economic contract has been broken.

"Doublethink": the latest threat to women's rights in Spain

George Orwell’s “1984” is alive and well in Spain as the Minister for Justice talks- up plans to deny women the right to an abortion, says Liz Cooper

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