This week's editor

AdamWidth95.jpg

Adam Ramsay is co-editor of OurKingdom.

Control over people's lives is shifting beyond the grasp of traditional institutions. Democracy is embraced as a vision, but can be endlessly frustrated or disappointing in practice.

A warmed-up cold war

The east-west dispute over Crimea is full of tensions within as well as between each side. Its drivers include the chance to refuel older geopolitical ambitions.

North African diversities: Algeria in flux

Algeria’s circles of power and their relationship to a complex society and history are hard to grasp. Francis Ghilès describes his own route to understanding the country in the post-independence era, when the heavy legacy of the past mixed with the confident idealism of the present.

A different climate

Many new paths to climate action are being taken, with the global south in the forefront. Even modest support and publicity from their northern counterparts can bring huge benefits. 

Lords impede UK citizen-stripping move

In the latest episode in the UK government’s attempts to extend its power to strip UK citizens of their nationality, the House of Lords has thrown a spanner in the works.

Tunisia, from hope to delivery

Tunisia has turned a political corner. But great economic problems remain which require careful management and good government, says Francis Ghilès.

Genocide and justice: where now?

Two decades after the Rwanda genocide, the promised hopes of international accountability for such crimes is in trouble. Andrew Wallis examines the ingredients of a crisis that is both legal and political.

The drone-casualty-law-civic nexus

The issue of civilian casualties from armed-drone strikes in Afghanistan and elsewhere needs transparency from Britain's military establishment. Both legal and civic pressures are rising.

Syria: Kessab's battle and Armenians' history

The takeover by anti-Damascus rebels of an Armenian village in northern Syria, near the border with Turkey, has triggered a propaganda war which focuses on the position of Syria's Armenians. This highlights core aspects of Armenians' experience since the 1915 genocide, says Vicken Cheterian.

America's chimerical pivot

The United States's shift towards Asia is being tested by global economic realities, say Ernesto Gallo & Giovanni Biava.

The drone evasion

A parliamentary report on the UK's use of armed-drones in Afghanistan is, in its language and its attitude to casualties, a study in closure.

China, between self and society

The need for an ethical vision to hold society together saw China's former premier Wen Jiabao look to Adam Smith. What does this reveal about the elite's thinking, asks Kerry Brown.

Military and Islamist failure: what next?

Both leading models of rule in the Arab world are bankrupt. Where is the next one to come from, asks Hazem Saghieh.

A tale of two speeches

Vladimir Putin's vision of Russia's destiny has parallels with George W Bush's of the United States in the aftermath of 9/11. This makes the existing crisis over Ukraine even more acute.

Still 'Our Man in Havana': foreign policy reporting's elitism problem

Foreign policy reporting in the British media is dominated by an elite and a false neutrality presenting a particular ideology simply as authoritative.  What is used as an argument for diversity is also a sign of Britain’s colonial hangover, and the unexamined question of who is positioned as the voice of reason. 

Egypt, an escape from reality

The spread of absurd conspiracy thinking reveals a hard truth about Egypt's condition, says Hazem Saghieh.

Iraq, past and future war

The retreat from Afghanistan is proving hard enough for the United States. But its military return to Iraq is much more serious.

Crimea's referendum: four dangers

The planned vote to transfer Crimea from Ukraine to Russia will plant the seeds of greater conflict in the peninsula.

The Madrid blasts, ten years later

In the tenth anniversary of the attack on Madrid’s rail network, Diego Muro analyses the consequences of the blasts for both the European Union and Spain. "Europe’s 9/11", he says, contributed to the decline of the Basque group ETA and to the creation of new mechanisms of coordination and cooperation at the European level.

Ukraine's crisis, the west's trap

The dangerous stand-off with Russia over Ukraine is also a display of the west's skewed perceptions and moral vanities.   

Latin America: re-election and democracy

"Very few are willing to step down and many of those who did are trying to come back." The political ambitions of Latin America's political leaders are reshaping the region's democracy and constitutional practice, says Daniel Zovatto.  

Kleptocracy: final stage of Soviet-style socialism

The tumult in Ukraine marks a wider crisis of the corrupt post-Soviet model. The impact will be felt most acutely in Russia itself, says Krzysztof Bobinski.

An Armenian perspective on Khojali

Many civilians were killed in the war between the newly independent states of Armenia and Azerbaijan in the early 1990s. But the disputed period raises larger questions of common suffering, says Gerard Libaridian, adviser to Armenia's president at the time, who reflects on one incident that casts a long shadow.

Climate politics: a melting glacier...

A new political tone on climate change in Britain is matched by a breakthrough in understanding the retreat of tropical glaciers.

North Korea: elite shame, world test

A credible United Nations report on North Korea demands a humane and practical response to its people's degradation, says Kerry Brown.

Bosnia, and vanishing European leadership

Bosnian citizens' protest against corruption and misgovernance also reveals the deep flaws of the country's ethno-nationalist system. But where is Europe?

Syndicate content