This week's guest editors

Gender violence, Narendra Modi and the Indian elections

The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has a good chance of winning the forthcoming general election in India. Amrit Wilson reports on discussions about what life has been like for women in the states where the BJP has been in power, and what may lie ahead

Iraq, past and future war

The retreat from Afghanistan is proving hard enough for the United States. But its military return to Iraq is much more serious.

Syria in the context of the Arab Uprisings

These are videos of a conference on Syria that took place in London, February 2014.

Crimea's referendum: four dangers

The planned vote to transfer Crimea from Ukraine to Russia will plant the seeds of greater conflict in the peninsula.

Egypt’s campaign of elimination: pro-June 30 analysts and the quantitative rationalization for Egypt’s coup

This sort of explanation reads much better than admitting to a naked power grab, sacrificing in the process Egypt’s first free and fair elections.

Anti–westernism in Turkey

Erdoğan now adopts the same rhetoric of his political opponents even though they were imprisoned for attempting to overthrow his government. This anti-western, conspiracy-driven rhetoric may lead to a point of no return.

Palestinian Christians address Christian Zionism

The Christ at the Checkpoint conference taking place this week, hopes to discuss Palestinian Christian attitudes towards Christian Zionism.

Women’s rights in the new Tunisian constitution

The constitution was voted in during a period when belief in the status quo changing had lost all traction. Due to the security situation, public opinion was dominated by fear. As such, Tunisia's transition will have to take place on a different level, namely in the field of legislation and legal practice.

Status quo in Bahrain

As the struggle in Bahrain continues, people in the west need to hold their governments accountable for their support of despotic regimes. 

Egypt under Sisi

The street in Cairo has become an insecure and volatile place. VICE News has been following avid supporters of General Sisi, revolutionaries who feel their aspirations are far from realisation and members of the Muslim Brotherhood outlawed by the military government.

The Madrid blasts, ten years later

In the tenth anniversary of the attack on Madrid’s rail network, Diego Muro analyses the consequences of the blasts for both the European Union and Spain. "Europe’s 9/11", he says, contributed to the decline of the Basque group ETA and to the creation of new mechanisms of coordination and cooperation at the European level.

Between legality and legitimacy: Romania’s fight against corruption

Romania has made vital steps in developing its institutional capabilities to deal with corruption. The way that such institutions have been strengthened raises important questions about the nature of its democratic governance. 

Raymond Williams and 'The emerging landscape of thought and practice'

The potential for this project to tap into the many and diverse informal ‘education-for-social-purpose’ groups and activities could extend ‘back to the future’ readings and reflections, making the essential links and connections with the best that is available in established institutions.

The democratic potential of activist performance

One could hardly imagine a better illustration than Putin’s regime for the idea that the Presidency is itself a performative performance, ritualized but only too brutally effective, in contrast with the impotence of the demos.

Public engagement, a social priority?

Living in a perpetual state of fear, people prefer to isolate themselves from what they perceive as the “ineffective” mechanisms of public participation; creating and perpetuating a negative vicious circle. 

On a good day she would kiss me back: transforming trauma into creative energy and action

Instead of giving in, the deepest thing we can do with trauma is to transmute pain into actions that heal ourselves and help other people. A powerful meditation on love, loss, recovery and resistance.

Contesting patriarchy-as-governance: lessons from youth-led activism

Youth-led mobilisation has mocked and exposed patriarchal power by unmasking its politics of social control. Are we on the threshold of a new politics of gender creating cross-gender alliances around struggles against autocracy?

CSW weather vane: fault lines and prospects for women's human rights

As battles over women’s human rights rage on around the world, governments have gathered in New York this week to set some definitive agreements at the UN’s annual Commission on the Status of Women

Yemen’s troubled transition

In Yemen a transition towards a new political dispensation is threatened by Islamist violence, drone strikes, southern secessionism and tribal militancy. But concentrating on the first alone and failing to understand the wider context will not secure it.

Ukraine's crisis, the west's trap

The dangerous stand-off with Russia over Ukraine is also a display of the west's skewed perceptions and moral vanities.   

The thin blue line between security, policing and the arms trade

On March 12-14 the quiet English town of Farnborough will play host to the Security & Policing conference and exhibition. This event will bring together some of the world's largest arms companies with some of the worst human rights abusers.

Voting for the climate?

Climate policy should be a major consideration for voters heading for the polls in May’s European parliamentary elections.

Latin America: re-election and democracy

"Very few are willing to step down and many of those who did are trying to come back." The political ambitions of Latin America's political leaders are reshaping the region's democracy and constitutional practice, says Daniel Zovatto.  

Introducing Bill McKibben: social movement creation today

Is one of America’s most prominent environmentalists, Bill McKibben, heading up a leaderless movement? If not, what kind of leader is he? Book review.

Lower aspirations for higher education

The British university system was until recently seen as one of the best in the world. Now students pay dearly for the privilege of supporting big business, says Barbara Gunnell 

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