This week's editor

Jeremy Noble, editor

Jeremy Noble and the oDR team edit the front page this week.

A Tory feminist takes on an anarcha feminist

A three-part exchange between an anarcha feminist and Feminism for Tories blogger 'Clara X'.

Five things you need to know about the NHS bill

The NHS bill proposes a radical shake-up of England's health sector. Here are some key facts everyone should know.

The blame game

Problems of illegality and impropriety in Britain's financial industry go far beyond the casino operations and investment banks, they are a common part of the industry's culture.

Speaking with double tongues: what’s gone wrong in Hungary?

Now whoever asks a question is arrogantly refused the moral right of posing the question at all, and is actually faced with a threat that has been openly codified in law. That’s new. But Hungary's authoritarians still have to speak to the outside world in ‘European’. Europe is key.

Social democracy and Europe’s crisis

Elections in France in 2012, Germany in 2013, the European elections of 2014 and the ongoing negotiations for the reform of the EU’s multi-annual financial framework for the 2014-2020 period are opportunities. Whether socialists and social democrats will take advantage of them or not, remains to be seen.

The socio-economic foundations of Bahrain’s political crisis

A study of income inequality in Bahrain highlights the failure of the Government to extend its aid to those who need it most.

Cameron and the future of the Union: a forum

The Prime Minister has conceded that there will be a Scottish independence referendum and argued the case for the Union on these terms. This is a historic moment for Britain. openDemocracy asks its readers for their response in an open forum on the future of the Union.

Scottish self-government and the case for the union

The Prime Minister's Edinburgh speech on the Union was a historic moment for British politics. Now Scots must find their answer to his claim that Scotland in the Union is 'stronger, safer, richer and fairer'.

Paediatricians say: Drop the NHS Bill or you will damage children's health

In a letter to The Lancet 154 leading paediatricians call on the government to drop the Health and Social Care Bill

The Uneconomics guide to money creation

In it's latest book, "Where does money come from?", the New Economics Foundation provides one of the sharpest accounts of money creation in recent times. Can your high street bank really create money?

Can’t find a job in the UK? You’re not trying hard enough

Unemployment in Britain could reach 3 million this year, an entire new welfare-to-work industry has sprung up, and the Government still thinks its main task is to get the 'work shy' stacking shelves. Barbara Gunnell asks how, in this Government's vision, has a lack of jobs become the fault of the job seeker?

Financing the transition to a green economy

By keeping investments in clean energy off the agenda, the Kyoto process delayed by a decade any serious engagement with global warming. To get the transformation of capitalism on its way, a serious rethink of eco-investment finance is essential.

Why Businesses Should Learn to Govern

Many businesses are larger economic entities then most states. Therefore it is important for them to act responsibly in every way. Businesses should in fact learn to govern, not forced by law but by a positive sense of duty

Of incontinence pads and private equity

Recent revelations on the privatised health and elderly care sectors in Sweden make for an excellent example of the worst excesses that the profit-motive can lead to in formerly state-run sectors.

Inequality, robin hood, and a lobbying list of sorts... (Oligarchy Watch Part 2)

Democratic Audit continue their brief, thorough updates on the state of British governance.

Occupy London: not in decline, preparing for Spring

The mainstream media is itching to ring the funeral bells for Occupy London. Here, an occupier argues the movement is still going strong, and sets out plans for the coming months.

Economics as a public art

Time to move beyond neoliberalism and its convenient amnesia. Economic policy should be practiced as a public art, not an elite science.

Ministry of Fun or Ministry of Fumble: do we really need the DCMS?

There hasn't always been a Department for Culture, Media and Sport. So what is its role, and would Britain be better off without?

Profiting from confusion: a management consultant's view of the NHS

A management consultant working in healthcare speaks out on what can be a cynical profession, thriving on the fear and uncertainty of clients. He forecasts a worrying future in which consultants play a central role as the NHS prepares itself for radical reforms.

Capitalism and the University: the debate ends, the struggle continues

After the tuition fee protests, before the market-friendly White Paper on Higher Education was silently abandoned, there was a crucial space for reflection on the English university. Was it facing a neoliberal attack? Or essential reform? What was the ideal university? And how could it be realised?

Meet the new boss in Ireland

That’s how democracy works between the EU and Ireland. The EU and its servants in the Dáil either give the Irish people too many votes or none at all.

Whose network?

Reflections on Paul Mason's new book, 'Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere'.

Land grabs: the threat to African women’s livelihoods

Despite the African Union's commitment to strengthening women's access and control of land by placing land rights in the public domain of human rights, it is silent on the issue of land grabs. This is a gap that the AU's land policy framework needs to plug, says Kathambi Kinoti

Disillusion, mistrust and suspicion: the legacy of the Afghan war

When we call for greater security, the soldiers tell us they are here for rebuilding. When we call for rebuilding, they state they are here for the security. In the end, they guarantee neither.
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