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Stop Trump – definitely! But then what?

Resisting Trump should involve asking the UK government to reconsider its approach to global security alliances.

Albanian rap and hyper-masculinity

Albanian rap songs are hugely popular in Albania, Kosova and Macedonia, shaping mainstream ideas of masculinity. But will a new generation of rappers pose a challenge to these norms?

Out of the box: Megan Prescott on Skins, bodybuilding and busting gender roles

Megan Prescott discusses her experiences of gender inequality, public scrutiny and subverting stereotypes as a young actress, writer and competitive bodybuilder.

India's female genital mutilation: a thousand-year-old secret

So little was known, until recently, about the secretive practice of FGM in a small  Muslim community that India is not even on the UN’s list of FGM countries.

Standing our ground at the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

When civic space is under attack, we make no dangerous accommodations. We stand up, and we fight back.

Skin deep: reproducing aboriginal women in colonial Australia

Zoe Holman speaks to author Liz Conor about her new book 'Skin Deep: Settler Impressions of Aboriginal Women' and the role these colonial images played, and continue to play, in Australia.

Escaping domestic violence: ‘according to the law, you are not here’

Many women survivors of violence in Europe cannot access support services because of their migration status. The right to live free from violence should be based on presence in a territory not legal status.  

A separation: Syrian asylum seekers in Germany

Rapidly changing asylum policies, plus legal and bureaucratic hurdles mean that many Syrian asylum seekers in Germany are separated from their families for years or even forced apart post-arrival. Gender shapes this experience.

Trump's slap in the face of Lady Liberty

Will women be turned away from the UN Commission on the Status of Women, to be held in March, in New York? The world's global institutions must fight the 'Muslim Ban', starting with the United Nations.

Under Trump, we are all women

The same strategies used against women for decades by the Christian right and the anti-abortion movement are now, under Donald Trump's presidency, being turned on the American people as a whole.

‘Woman’ has become a dirty word

The Women’s Marches' use of ‘pussy’ as a symbol has led to accusations that they were trans-exclusionary.  Are we witnessing the erasure of woman as a sex category?

Investigating Sri Lanka’s ‘nude’ culture

Learning from schoolgirls and boys about blackmail, ‘nudes’ and cyber exploitation in Sri Lanka.

On India’s Republic Day, we must remember Kunan Poshpora

As the Kunan Poshpora mass rape hearings continue, we talk to the co-author of a book which seeks to remember the 1991 events as an act of resistance.

The Washington March: Historic communion of women

The women’s march brought many first-timers on to the streets. A first-timer writes about why the election of Donald Trump spurred her to travel from North Carolina to Washington DC to take part.

America – are you woke?

Now that the first wave of Women’s Marches is over, Americans must prepare for the difficult work of solidarity.

Women storm the capitol

Drawing from the ground, SASHALYNILLO captures the raw energy of the Women's March on Washington.

After the Women's March on London: what now?

If just 3-4% of the 100,000 people who marched commit to further intersectional organising and activism, this could be a historic tipping point for feminist struggle in Britain.

Sisters and the sisterhood: a video debate with Kimberlé Crenshaw and others

As Women's Marches take place around the world, listen to civil rights advocate Kimberle Crenshaw, CEO Margaret Heffernan and journalist Myriam Francois debate feminism, class and solidarity. 

Towards a feminist United Nations: a six-point agenda for the new SG

Leading feminist thinkers and UN staff, past and present, have articulated six key recommendations for António Guterres, the new Secretary-General.

Through the eyes of a queer Arab man: a review of ‘Guapa’

The novel Guapa by Saleem Haddad is set in the aftermath of the 2011 revolutions. Reading it during the fall of Aleppo, on the sixth anniversary of the Arab Spring, is a moving experience.

The first transgender celebrity in China and her sexist dating show

Jin Xing is a progressive icon, and the first person to openly undergo gender reassignment surgery in China. Why is she now hosting a show that helps parents select docile daughters-in-law?

Seeking justice for rape by the state in Bastar, India

For tribal women living in the Bastar region of central India, sexual abuse at the hands of security forces has become routine. The state government has now been challenged to take responsibility.

Precarious migrant motherhood in Lebanon

Ethiopian migrant domestic workers who give birth to children in Lebanon are caught in a trap between the struggle to bring up a child with no legal status, and the difficulty of exiting the country.

On surviving the Christmas holidays as a lesbian in Bulgaria

"I recall the Christmas of 2011, when I was kindly asked by my family to consult an imam to break the 'evil curse', which had 'made' me a lesbian."

António Guterres: The Ninth Man

How will UN Secretary-General António Guterres demonstrate the UN's intention to resist the rising tide of misogyny in the US and the global wave of misogynistic nationalism?

Autumn: writing the now as we live through it

Published this autumn, Ali Smith's latest novel Autumn explores the political upheavals of summer 2016, as well as issues of love, loss, art and friendship.

UK National Security Strategy: security for whom?

To make real progress on tackling insecurity, there needs to be far greater commitment by the British government to addressing its causes, and not just its symptoms.

Sex work: not prohibited, not permitted

Criminalization sets a context in which the range of human rights violations experienced by sex workers is validated. Cross-movement collaboration on decriminalizing sex work is needed, now, more than ever.

The Sharia debate in the UK: who will listen to our voices?

Over 300 abused women have signed a statement opposing Sharia courts and religious bodies, warning of the growing threat to their rights and to their collective struggles for security and independence.

The depopulation of the Chagos Archipelago: guardians of culture, tradition and the stability of the home

The islands were ‘swept and sanitised’. An albatross/ was spared, and the order given: ‘…a few man fridays...must go’.

Deaths, deportations and arrests: violence against migrants in Morocco

EU policy is blocking routes to Europe for those suffering from the neocolonial and capitalist exploitation and nurturing of conflicts throughout Africa by western countries.

Borderlands: words against walls

Both material and figurative walls are shaping our present. Now is the time for the arts and humanities to intervene with critical reflection and compassion into spaces of ‘crisis’

'We are the granddaughters of the witches you weren’t able to burn.'

An art project on two narrow boats hitched together on a canal in northern England is celebrating co-dependency - countering both the racial divide and the massive cuts to women’s services.

Are we all beheaded Copts?

Is the beheading of 21 Egyptian Christians by ISIS in Libya associated with a broader political project of cleansing the region of religious minorities? Would this not deserve demonstrations of solidarity?

The voice of Berta Cáceres has become the voice of millions

Graffiti on the walls in Honduras - Berta Vive! Teenagers chanting as they march - Berta Caceres Flores, sown in the heart of all rebellions !  Berta didn’t die, she multiplied.

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