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People on the move - changing minds, changing placesPeople on the Move publishes testimony and research-based articles that showcase the voices and analyses that are marginalised in the public debate on migration, most importantly those of migrants and refugees themselves. The dialogue seeks to shift the focus of the debate away from borders, security and control, to developing migration policies that are fairer and more sustainable. Commissioning Editor: Jennifer Allsopp


Reproductive rights on the move: refugee women in Greece struggle to access contraception

Half of female asylum-seekers in Europe are aged 18-34. With little control over their environments, how can they retain control over their bodies?

Stop blaming the rescuers

Attacks against rescue efforts in the Mediterranean must stop. The recent Italian and EU proposals are just the last steps of an ongoing de-legitimisation campaign that is putting the lives of thousands of migrants at risk.

Art and the refugee ‘crisis’: Mediterranean blues

Artists are mapping new itineraries of the Mediterranean, throwing into relief an incurable colonial wound that continues to bleed into the present.

Too many Afghan women in London face racism, sexism – and unwanted pregnancies

Recent research on Afghan immigrant women in London has revealed a multi-layered crisis. What can be done to address this, and to empower them?

What could a multi-million euro arts festival offer struggling communities in Greece?

The world-class €37 million Documenta arts festival comes to Athens and brings challenging questions about art’s relevance amid economic and humanitarian crises.

Theresa May and the love police

In Theresa May’s “One Nation” we are all border guards. Her vision of the Big Society will make us all shrink.

Why is so much art about the ‘refugee crisis’ so bad?

Even at a celebrity art gala you can don an emergency blanket and feel good about yourself. Hard political questions, not required.

Locked in limbo: the prolonged detention of stateless people in Europe must end now

Some stateless people are detained for months, even years, without any real prospect of their cases being resolved. This must change.

Reflections on post-humanitarianism in dark times

British opposition to search-and-rescue operations in the Mediterranean and Polish pseudo-theological justifications not to help refugees exploit the insecurities of the humanitarian movement.

What does justice mean for migrant women workers?

Those who want to help migrant women access justice must listen to them, and their concerns and priorities.

A very British tug of war over Europe’s child refugees

Parliament has voted to silence the voices of local communities. Their message of European solidarity and warm welcome for refugees is an anathema to the politics of Brexit Britain.

Will Nepal give equal citizenship rights to women?

Nepali women are treated as second-class citizens, due to discriminatory nationality law. 

No Women’s Day without refugee women

Hand-in-hand with Trump, Theresa May is not merely playing to an anti-migrant populist crowd but helped to create it. This system is working as intended, but it must be disrupted.

Lessons from Syria on women's empowerment during conflict

Syrian women will be the pillars of any future democratic process. Their efforts deserve support from national and international actors.

‘I am not safe’: on the run as a gay man in Afghanistan

Ahmad Faizi’s story is one of many contradicting the UK Home Office guidelines that “it may be a safe and viable option for a gay man to relocate to Kabul”.

Israel’s invisible refugees

We often think of the Refugees Welcome culture as a ‘European’ phenomenon, but an exchange between German and Israeli civil society shows the value of turning our eyes outwards towards global examples of solidarity and support.

Stop Trump – definitely! But then what?

Resisting Trump should involve asking the UK government to reconsider its approach to global security alliances.

Internally displaced women: social rupture and political voice

Displacement is social as well as geographical. Women’s welfare and survival depends significantly on their social relationships; displacement destroys this resource.

Escaping domestic violence: ‘according to the law, you are not here’

Many women survivors of violence in Europe cannot access support services because of their migration status. The right to live free from violence should be based on presence in a territory not legal status.  

A separation: Syrian asylum seekers in Germany

Rapidly changing asylum policies, plus legal and bureaucratic hurdles mean that many Syrian asylum seekers in Germany are separated from their families for years or even forced apart post-arrival. Gender shapes this experience.

Trump's slap in the face of Lady Liberty

Will women be turned away from the UN Commission on the Status of Women, to be held in March, in New York? The world's global institutions must fight the 'Muslim Ban', starting with the United Nations.

Uganda’s unsung heroes of refugee protection

As responses to refugees and asylum-seekers become a multi-million dollar endeavour globally, everyday acts of kindness continue to keep refugees alive and maintain their dignity, even in the face of death.

Precarious migrant motherhood in Lebanon

Ethiopian migrant domestic workers who give birth to children in Lebanon are caught in a trap between the struggle to bring up a child with no legal status, and the difficulty of exiting the country.

Deaths, deportations and arrests: violence against migrants in Morocco

EU policy is blocking routes to Europe for those suffering from the neocolonial and capitalist exploitation and nurturing of conflicts throughout Africa by western countries.

Borderlands: words against walls

Both material and figurative walls are shaping our present. Now is the time for the arts and humanities to intervene with critical reflection and compassion into spaces of ‘crisis’

Dangerous journeys: violence against women migrants in Turkey

Syrian women migrants in Turkey face many forms of violence - sexual harassment, forced and early marriage, polygamy and trafficking for sexual exploitation. The perpetrators include soldiers, border officers and migration officers.

Invisible fathers of immigration detention in the UK

The British state has regulated relationships between its citizens and certain foreigners since at least the Colonial era. Today’s border controls continue to police people’s intimate lives and retain sexist and racist assumptions. 

'Bogus' asylum seekers? The ethics of truth-telling in the asylum system

The British tabloids and the Home Office are united by their assumption that asylum seekers who lie during their claims are undeserving of protection. Yet this view runs contrary both to widely held moral principle and refugee law.

Lost childhoods: age disputes in the UK asylum system

Children seeking asylum in the UK are regularly disbelieved about how old they are and can end up facing harmful, protracted disputes. The culture of disbelief so often criticised in the Home Office has now seeped into some local authorities.

Humanitarian Corridors: beyond political gesture

Around 300 people have entered Italy from Lebanon via safe and legal routes pioneered by faith groups. This pilot project holds great potential as an innovative approach to the so-called ‘refugee crisis’.

Small, illegal refugee paradise

Hotel “Oniro” is a better option for a fugitive life away from homelessness and another decent station for some Syrian refugees in Greece.

Arresting the mass detention of migrants: ‘Build trust, not walls’

The pragmatic development of alternatives to detention with civil society at the fore can help to arrest the slide into the abyss of mass detention of migrants in Europe. 

The arts and humanities: tackling the challenges of mass displacement

When we let people die rather than provide safety, we face not a ‘refugee crisis’ but a crisis of values. The arts help define those values which shape the kinds of societies we want to live in. 

Theresa May, this is not a ‘crisis of migration’, but a crisis of inhumanity

In a carefully coded speech, the UK Prime Minister categorises people on the move as “threats that we face” alongside war and global terrorism.

Refugee women in the UK: Pushing a stone into the sea

From personal experience I know that arrival in the UK for asylum seekers does not signal safety, but reform is a ‘chaser game’: refugee women are pressuring the Home Office to improve decision making and end detention, says Beatrice Botomani.

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