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Forced Migration and the Humanities

The current 'refugee crisis' is not just a crisis of geopolitics, but also of human values. What role do the arts and humanities play in this context? Can criticism and the arts activate political transformation? The project Forced Migration and the Humanities is an editorial partnership with openDemocracy 50.50 led by Mariangela Palladino (Keele University) and Agnes Woolley (Royal Holloway University of London)

Art and the refugee ‘crisis’: Mediterranean blues

Artists are mapping new itineraries of the Mediterranean, throwing into relief an incurable colonial wound that continues to bleed into the present.

What could a multi-million euro arts festival offer struggling communities in Greece?

The world-class €37 million Documenta arts festival comes to Athens and brings challenging questions about art’s relevance amid economic and humanitarian crises.

Why is so much art about the ‘refugee crisis’ so bad?

Even at a celebrity art gala you can don an emergency blanket and feel good about yourself. Hard political questions, not required.

Reflections on post-humanitarianism in dark times

British opposition to search-and-rescue operations in the Mediterranean and Polish pseudo-theological justifications not to help refugees exploit the insecurities of the humanitarian movement.

The depopulation of the Chagos Archipelago: guardians of culture, tradition and the stability of the home

The islands were ‘swept and sanitised’. An albatross/ was spared, and the order given: ‘…a few man fridays...must go’.

Borderlands: words against walls

Both material and figurative walls are shaping our present. Now is the time for the arts and humanities to intervene with critical reflection and compassion into spaces of ‘crisis’

The arts and humanities: tackling the challenges of mass displacement

When we let people die rather than provide safety, we face not a ‘refugee crisis’ but a crisis of values. The arts help define those values which shape the kinds of societies we want to live in. 

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