only search openDemocracy.net

Women and the Economy

G20 and corruption: why gender matters

Research indicates that when a gender participation "tipping point" has been reached there will be genuine change in policy direction and ultimate impact. If the G20 is serious about tackling corruption it needs more women leaders.

Why the G20 needs to tackle gender inequality: Brisbane and beyond

The G20 should listen to Oxfam and assess its agenda and actions based on how they support the fulfilment of women’s human rights and lead to gender equality. This is not a question of adding yet another issue to the G20 agenda.

G20: can women's human rights and economic growth co-exist?

Will the G20 adopt an approach that meets human rights standards for economic growth at the Brisbane Summit? More representation of women at the governance level is essential. Who is at the table matters.

Gender at the G20

If the G20 is serious about 'sustainable and balanced growth' as the 'premier forum for international economic cooperation', it needs to demonstrate its serious intent towards matters of gender equality at the G20 Leaders' Summit in Brisbane this weekend.

Whose recovery?: Gendered austerity in the UK

The impact of government spending cuts, combined with structural sexism in the UK, means that for British women, news of an economic recovery means nothing to their daily lives.

Gender and poverty in the UK: Inside the household and across the life course

Unravelling the components of couples’ incomes and investigating individual trajectories over the life course are essential to produce a more rounded and complete picture of the links between gender and poverty, says Fran Bennett. 

Unpaid care: the missing women’s rights issue

Unsupported and unshared care work perpetuates women’s poverty, political marginalization and social subordination. The distribution of care is not natural or inevitable, but rather socially constructed and in our power to change, says Kate Donald

Neoliberal neopatriarchy: the case for gender revolution

We are living in a distinctive moment when neoliberal capitalism and neopatriarchy converge. Male dominance is no mere footnote to this new historic settlement. It is central. And feminism is decisive in the resistance.

Austerity and domestic violence: mapping the damage

Austerity has taken its toll on domestic violence provisions, in a fracturing that cuts across institutions, sectors and lives in the UK

Is gendered austerity finally on the political agenda?

The 2013 Green Party conference made women and austerity one of its themes, while a new report from the Women’s Budget Group calls for a ‘Plan F’ to tackle the impact of the crisis on women's lives.  Is gendered austerity finally gaining the attention of political parties?

From the war on terror to austerity: a lost decade for women and human rights

Patriarchy, militarism and neoliberalism have created a matrix in which women and women’s rights can never flourish because none of them place human values and human dignity at their core. Heather McRobie reflects on the conversations at the Nobel Women's Initiative conference in Belfast.

1% Feminism

Since Sheryl Sandberg has taken it upon herself to jump-start the stalled feminist revolution it’s worth taking a look at the brand of feminism she espouses, says Linda Burnham 

Capitalism's bright 'Third Billion' future?

Management consultants have their eye on women as growth drivers and change agents for multi-national companies, and activists and politicians campaigning for women's rights are being advised to stop talking about trafficking and rights. Marion Bowman, reporting from the Trust Women conference, tells a Christmas story of 'The Third Billion' and Bedford Falls

When austerity sounds like backlash: gender and the economic crisis

The discourse of 'urgency' surrounding the public sector cuts masks their widespread reinvention of a Conservative vision of British women as mothers and carers.

How women are paying for the recession in the UK

It was predictable and in fact predicted. The British Government’s austerity programme has turned back the clock on women’s rights and hard-won economic gains.

Don’t bank on gender equality from the UK high street

Women are facing a double-bind, bearing the brunt of banks' practices both in the build up to, and in the wake of, the economic crisis. In a feminised recession, with women bearing the brunt of job losses and austerity measures, do we now need to add another grim example – women being undermined by their banks?

Welcome to my home, welcome to my hell

The scandal of those in Britain with no shelter at all is well-known, but what of the "housed homeless" and the hundreds of thousands of sub-standard and squalid living spaces in the towns and cities where the poorest try to raise their families?

Making visible the invisible: commodification is not the answer

If you are invisible as a producer in the GDP, you are invisible in the distribution of benefits in the economic framework of  the national budget. As feminists we must embrace an ecological model if we are to transform economic power, and the market and commodification must be seen as the servants of such an approach. 

Women defining economic citizenship

How can we empower women to participate in existing economic structures and also transform them? We need a model of economic power and citizenship that is not simply about sustaining capital or growth, but sustaining and celebrating life itself.  Jenny Allsopp reports directly from the AWID Forum 2012. Here are parts two and three of her report.

What does transforming economic power mean?

Today's targeting of women in processes of realigning economic controls is perhaps quite unique. In order to unpack and understand economic power, we must revisit the different realms in which power operates, and the various forms that it takes - visible, hidden and invisible.

Gender and destitution in the UK

The real migration scandal in the UK are the people forced to live without any recourse to public funds. Migrant women who leave violent husbands, and women who have been trafficked into the UK to work in the sex industry, face the additional trauma of destitution, says Jenny Phillimore

The feminisation of poverty and the myth of the 'welfare queen'

Governments are constructing social policy based on misrepresentations and stereotypes about poor people and welfare claimants, rather than by reference to the structural inequalities that affect everyone, argues Kate Donald

Has neoliberalism knocked feminism sideways?

Feminism needs to recapture the state from the neoliberal project to which it is in hock in order to make it deliver for women. It must guard against atomisation and recover its transformative aspirations to shape the new social order that is hovering on the horizon, says Rahila Gupta

The precariat and Mad Men secretaries: temping under the Tory government

Temporary employment is increasing, challenging the binary between employed and unemployed. Temping agencies use the language of flexibility and choice, but are they also reinforcing the regressive gender roles promoted by the Coalition government?

Life on a knife edge: migrant domestic workers in the UK

At what point do the rights of migrant domestic workers as human beings and as workers start to take precedence over their status as migrants?

Syndicate content