Building "a new Turkey": gender politics and the future of democracy

Can Turkey's government eschew gender equality, demonise the country's dynamic women's movement, and still prevent gender-based violence? Can a party that rejects gender equality be a force for democratisation?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

Building "a new Turkey": gender politics and the future of democracy

Can Turkey's government eschew gender equality, demonise the country's dynamic women's movement, and still prevent gender-based violence? Can a party that rejects gender equality be a force for democratisation?

openDemocracy.net - free thinking for the world

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Who's afraid of the 'global poor'?

Shifting the migration debate to consider the impact of global phenomena such as climate change and global capitalism on the movement of people requires an understanding of scarcity and insecurity as factors which affect citizens and non-citizens alike.

Seeking safety in Algeria: Syrian refugee women’s resilience

For many Syrian women in Algeria, the gendered experience of violence and displacement has been compounded by the discrimination they now face as women refugees, says Latefa Guemar.

Knitted Together: Crafting a culture of welcome for refugee women

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Aamer Rahman’s comedy addresses racism, Islamophobia, the war on terror and social justice from a perspective that is undeniably black, in the political sense of the word.  Reni Eddo-Lodge speaks to Rahman about how speaking out about racism is still misconstrued.

Syrian women refugees: out of the shadows

Syrian women refugees cite rape, or the fear of rape, as one of the main reasons they fled. A coalition of grassroots women and international advocates has formed to integrate services and advocacy, enabling women refugees to participate in formulating the political future they want to see

Due diligence for women's human rights: transgressing conventional lines

On international human rights day, Yakin Ertürk discusses the new vulnerabilities faced by women, including refugee womenand the new opportunities for remedy offered by the international human rights system.

Refugee women in the UK: Pushing a stone into the sea

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Rape, marriage, and rights

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What will it take to end violence against women?

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The 'women-in-STEM-wash': diversity in science appropriated for corporate branding

Although female participation in science and engineering has won recent high-profile victories, the appropriation of diversity for corporate branding and neoliberal agendas is creating the gender equivalent of green-washing

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Sexual violence, access to justice, and human rights

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From men's liberation to men’s rights: angry white men in the US

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'Peace will bring prosperity': Northern Ireland’s big lie?

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Women's emancipation and human rights: "Can These Bones Live?"

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Remembering Glasgow's Mackintosh building

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A common vision: The abolition of militarism

"If our common dream is a world without weapons and militarism, why don’t we say so? Why be silent about it? It would make a world of difference if we refused to be ambivalent about the violence of militarism". Mairead Maguire, Nobel Peace laureate, speaking at the Sarajevo Peace Event.

What we owe Nigeria’s kidnapped schoolgirls

People worldwide are calling for action to bring back the kidnapped schoolgirls in Nigeria. But concern for the girls demands that we think carefully about the harmful consequences of proposed solutions – especially those calling for US military intervention.

Women's voices in northern Nigeria: hearing the broader narratives

As the world's attention focuses on northern Nigeria with the abduction of schoolgirls from Chibok, Fatimah Kelleher explores the importance of understanding the voices and agency of northern Nigerian women's own activism for change.

Dealing with the past: "There must never be a hierarchy of pain"

"I would like you to come with me to explore the past through the eyes of victims and survivors. It is difficult a very difficult place to get to and an even more difficult place to leave". Kathryn Stone, Victims' Commissioner for Northern Ireland.

Belonging in Northern Ireland: portraits of the individual migrant

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Journeys of great uncertainty

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Mazí Mas, “with us”

Women have played a seminal role in keeping food cultures all over the world alive. Nikandre Kopcke discusses her inspiration for setting up a pop-up restaurant which showcases the culinary talents and diverse cultural heritages of migrant women in London.

African feminist engagements with film

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Women in Northern Ireland: sharing the learning

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Why don’t men care?

Caregiving is neither a male nor female responsibility - it’s what helps to make us all human. It’s time we reshaped society and social norms to make equality possible. 

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