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This week's editor

“What is democracy if it doesn’t lead to development for the people?”

Resisting a “deconsolidation of democracy” requires attendance to the specific needs of individual contexts, taking people out of poverty and centring the underserved majorities of women and the young.

Voices to lift our spirits

“In a protest, we’re all bystanders, we’re all there because of some attempt to marginalise us; the bystanders are the people making history.” Book review.

Museveni: the next ‘benevolent’ President for life?

In Uganda, Museveni and his supporters battle to remove the constitutional age limit which bars him from running again, by presenting himself as the expression of "the masses'"' wishes.

Why Catalonia is not the Balkans

An analysis of where the Spain/Yugoslavia comparison succeeds, and where it fails.

All refugees want to go home. Right?

Wanting to return home and restore one’s country should be a choice, not an obligation placed upon you by those also claiming to offer you protection.

Nationalism as a substitute for equality

Real equality cannot be achieved through distribution alone, but by relying on personal relationships with one another. If we are to reduce inequality, and fight populism, we must rehabilitate equality. Interview. Español

UK government set to ignore Northern Ireland parties’ transparency calls

Brokenshire loses his excuse for hiding DUP’s lavish Brexit donors, but still refuses to reveal their identity

Look that monster dead in the face: tackling domestic violence in lesbian relationships

Art can create safe spaces for queer women to address often-ignored domestic violence. This is important to end the silence, and to heal.

Solidarity under attack

How migrant activism in Italy (and beyond) is criminalised and used as a scapegoat for failed EU migration politics.

The New York Declaration on refugees: one year on

The New York Declaration called for states to ease pressure on less-developed countries like Lebanon, Jordan, and Ethiopia that host the most refugees.

Could India support a basic income?

After a successful pilot project in Madhya Pradesh the India Network for Basic Income is setting its sights higher.

Basic income’s third wave

The drive toward a basic income isn’t new. It’s a 100-year-old movement that has gotten stronger each time inequality has returned to the public discussion.

Southern perspectives on development: the missing link in discussions on modern slavery

Isn’t it strange that so few people who are assumed to be ‘modern slaves’ see themselves as such?

Danger: there’s a centrifuge in the White House

While centrifugal forces tear things apart, centripetal forces bring things together again.

A response to “Georgian land, Georgian freedom”

We recently published an article arguing in favour of Georgia’s proposed ban on selling agricultural land to foreign buyers. A foreign landowner with several years’ experience in the country’s agricultural sector uses his right of response to argue against the move.

Russia’s ravenous redistribution: the plunder of Sakhalin

Residents of Russia’s far-eastern island of Sakhalin are outraged by Moscow’s abrupt decision to take away regional budget revenues.

How to hide evidence of torture inside Russia’s prison system

In Russia, law enforcement quickly puts pressure on prisoners who come forward about torture inside the prison system. RU

Is the BBC hideously middle class?

And, if it is, why is this a problem, and what can be done about it?

Should we close our worlds? Or open them out?

Cities need an overarching, positive narrative that binds all people to where they live, and where day to day behaviour and activities connect well with civic life. Interview. 

‘Substantial’ fine linked to DUP’s secret Brexit donors

Former minister demands answers on £6,000 fine, questioning legality of DUP’s mystery source of Brexit cash

Catalonia: an incomplete transition?

The revolution to build democratic ‘stability’ and peace based on human rights and respect for citizen participation is an open-ended process in which dialogue, negotiation and participation are vital and ‘immortal’ cornerstones. Español

Catalunya and beyond: what’s after the nation-state?

To take back control we need neither to retreat to existing nation-states nor to replicate the nation state’s authoritarian structures at a smaller, regional level.

How lawyers fail migrants in the UK

Access to justice has diminished almost to vanishing point, leaving asylum seekers and irregular migrants at risk of exploitation.

Eight reasons why we shouldn’t use the term ‘modern slavery’

The imperialist and racist undertones of ‘modern slavery’ should be troubling for anybody seeking to advance human rights.

40.3 million slaves? Four reasons to question the new Global Estimates of Modern Slavery

The new slavery estimates will guide international policy for years to come, which is why we need to start taking their data limitations seriously.

Can theatre change your mind?

Most people don’t think of media as propaganda, but confirmation bias is rife. What can be done? 

A tale of two revolutions, or “decommunisation”, Ukrainian-style

Ukrainian politicians see their country’s Soviet heritage as a major obstacle on the way to a brave new world. It's a shame they’re using the same revolutionary methods as the communists to deal with it. RU

oD partners with the Festival for New Economic Thinking

openDemocracy is delighted to be partnering with the Festival for New Economic Thinking which is taking place on 19-20 Oct 2017 at the Edinburgh Corn Exchange. Economics is at a turning point. Soc...

Don’t give up on democracy in Moldova

MAIA SANDU JPG red.jpgMoldova had high hopes for democratic transition. But with an oligarch at the helm, democracy is under threat on the EU’s border.