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This week’s editor

Tom Rowley is editor of oDR, covering the progressive agenda in Eurasia.

Authoritarian elitism and popular movements in Brazil

Can a president institute radical popular change alongside structural inequality and a militarized elite? The Brazilian case suggests that a progressive political party requires more social movement mobilization, not less. Español

The ordinary virtues of cities

Talking to Phil Wood, co-founder of the intercultural cities model, last November, about love of cities, intercultural city planning, innovative local government, human rights and ‘ordinary virtues’. Interview.

Oslo: the small hotels where we meet

Talking to Geir Lippestad, then Vice-Mayor of Oslo, at an Intercultural Cities Milestone Event last November, about hatred of multiculturalism, diversity advantages, the responsibility of politicians, and win-win cities. Interview.

Brexit: whose will, which public?

Taking part in public life is a deeply affective process, at once personal and collective, and social media might just help us bridge the gap between the two.

Was Machiavelli a democrat? Is he relevant today?

However you read The Prince, it is a reminder that the elementary condition of good government is effective government.

How will a Syrian child delete the image of his poverty from search engines?

Media professionals should contribute to respecting the privacy of individuals or groups who are subjects of their news articles, especially when it concerns children and their privacy. عربي

Brexit Britain: are we all haunted by collapse?

The EU is literally following in the steps of the Soviet Union. I’ve been thinking about it since everything started with Greece…  Britain will be the first country.” Part two.

A populist myth about immigration courts and public opinion: evidence from the US and Sweden

The concept of mass immigration is politicized. Rather than registering reality objectively, it is used to further particular interests of the state as well as powerful non-state organisations.

From Afrin to Ghouta

The egalitarian, feminist and socialist enclaves created by the Kurdish left are attacked with particular ferocity by Mr Erdoğan’s army. Czech.

Clashing scales in Brexit Britain, or why we just can’t get along

The first of three essays contemplating the “complete reimagination of politics” which is the drama of Brexit. 

Drowning Belgrade: the Belgrade waterfront project in context

As Belgrade goes to the polls in today's municipal elections, the state is playing a fundamental role in the transition to neoliberal economics. Hence the undemocratic procedures bedevilling 'The Project'.

How Egypt functions in the Moroccan imagination

A journey through Morocco as an Egyptian. Amro Ali shares his observations and insights from common spaces of discussions.

The first steps towards exonerating Russian Gulag historian Yuri Dmitriyev

This Russian historian spent 13 months in pre-trial detention on fabricated child pornography charges. The latest court proceedings confirm that he’s just as “normal” as the rest of us.

The 2018 Italian election campaign viewed from Twitter

We have followed 1,579 candidates and tracked their Twitter conversations for two weeks now. Also, we collected 400,000 citizens’ retweets and replies to candidates’ tweets.

Moscow's armourers and British tabloids

Russia has sent two advanced fighter jets to Syria. But this is a tale of its vulnerability as much as its strength.

Why the sugar industry should not be renationalised

Sugar beet refining was a nationalised industry until the 1970s. But rather than harking back to the height of the sugar rush, we should be weaning ourselves off the white stuff. 

Story of an ‘unidentified’ detainee

From the Counter-Terrorism Division in Ankara, Turkey... The story’s named by others, but filled by women who resist the war. We live in a story whose title reads ‘unidentified’.

The untenable technophobia of the Left

On hate speech, fake news, anonymity and "new" politics. A warning. Español

As Russia’s presidential election approaches, apathy is running high

On 18 March, Russians go to the polls to elect a new president (or rather, re-elect the old one). But there’s little enthusiasm around. RU

Things that make for peace

What is required of Christians today in the light of the increasing number of wars, insurgencies, holocausts and genocide, is a deeper understanding of what true peacemaking costs.

Gun violence has dropped dramatically in three US states with very different gun laws

To have an honest, nonpartisan discussion about gun violence, we must look at what happened in New York, California, and Texas.

The deception virus infecting the global liberal order

There is a perceptible shift in public mood, and the search for a vaccine to the deception virus is in full swing. 

Duality, dualism, duelling and Brexit

Taking this opportunity to rethink a part of government crucial to a fair and dynamic society would be good politics. Whitehall is no more capable of doing this than Brussels.

USS is the tip of the iceberg. Our pensions system is a hot mess

The USS strikes should be a wakeup call to the crisis brewing in the UK pensions system.

Academic freedom in Tajikistan: critical engagement and solidarity

If academic solidarity and forms of critical engagement with Tajikistan are going to emerge, we must first recognise the primary problem comes from the regime. 

Israel complains about violation of its sovereignty while being a serial violator

In the 4-month period from 1 July to 30 October 2017, Israel violated Lebanon’s airspace 758 times for a total of 3,188 hours.

Italy's election, M5S and the case for Hegelian transformation

The first option for Italians is believing they can draw their bridge up and return to some mythological past which preceded the globalization game that the country has lost out in.

If Russia’s minorities are excluded from national political life, then why are they the most “loyal” on paper?

By rejecting popular support in Russia’s national republics, you can win more votes than you lose. RU

Brazil's political carnival

In the midst of the country’s haunting political crisis, more than ever before Carnival in Brazil has become an occasion for criticism, parody and political caricature . Español Português