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This week’s front page editor

Fox, Sky, Comcast, Disney: the endgame approaches

Before 2018 is out, Sky News will almost certainly be owned by one of three US media giants: Fox, Disney or Comcast. What can we learn from this protracted battle?

The latest on OpenGlobalRights: using the SDGs to curb authoritarian power and framing gun violence as a human rights issue

Recently on OpenGlobalRights, how Sustainable Development Goals might break human rights gridlock, why the right to bear arms is not a human right, and when human rights law is central to global health governance.

Was a Tory PR firm behind a smear campaign against Grenfell’s MP?

A PR firm run by a former Downing Street staffer claimed to be behind a series of media attacks on Labour MP for Kensington, Emma Dent Coad, openDemocracy can reveal.

Europe must honour its commitments: protect the nuclear deal

From an Iranian standpoint there continues to be a huge gap between what had been promised and what has actually been delivered.

Seventy years on, the Kumyk people in Dagestan are still fighting territorial claims

In Russia's North Caucasus, wartime deportations influence the complex relations between ethnic groups to this day. RU

The US teachers strike in historical perspective

Previous waves of unrest offer clues to the possible regeneration of the American labor movement.

The ‘Windrush generation’ and ‘illegal immigrants’ are both our kin

As well as newfound sympathy for the Windrush generation, we should remember that ‘illegal immigrants’ are our kin, especially if we are to challenge the racism of the ‘hostile environment’.

Creating Britain's first citizens' wealth fund

How rebuilding our depleted stock of social wealth holds the key to tackling inequality.

Our data doubles: how biometric surveillance ushers in new orders of control

The use of biometric data brings the border within the body: algorithms' apparent objectivity and efficiency obscure the brutality of the tasks they accomplish, deciding who is fit to stay or go, who to live or die. 

What is the meaning of the Five Star Movement?

Although it took different paths, what happened in Italy is similar to what has happened in France: both countries saw their traditional main parties from the left and the right implode.

Can grassroots historical initiatives bridge the gap between Poland and Ukraine?

With politicians in both countries unwilling to back down over worrying historical legislation, it’s up to historians, activists and journalists to reshape Polish-Ukrainian relations.

Meet Illuminator, the online project making space for discussing LGBT issues in Russia

The Illuminator project showcases the human targets of Russia’s conservative turn. RU

Doing anti-surveillance activism differently

Recent campaigns waged in two Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries provide some interesting lessons about challenging excessive state security power. 

Why the ‘good’ refugee is a bad idea

An opaque process of separating the ‘good’ Rohingya refugees from the ‘bad’ ones has begun under conditions where only seven and a half thousand out of one million people have national verification cards.

Key NHS ‘efficiency’ programme ‘RightCare’ called into question in Liverpool – and elsewhere?

NHS England is promoting ‘RightCare’ as a way for the NHS to deliver still more ‘efficiency savings’. But questions to Liverpool CCG show at least some local NHS managers are well aware of its flaws.

Talented solidarity: why Russia’s oldest human rights journal is important today

TRowley author pic.jpg

The Soviet underground publication Chronicle of Current Events turns 50 today. Its mission is still relevant.

 

Division and unity in Sunderland

As the British economy has moved away from manufacturing and toward financial services, growing numbers in the city are unemployed, underemployed or in precarious employment, and the use of food banks is on the rise.

Mining and employment: community struggles in Tunisia and South Africa

Extractivism all-over the African continent is still appropriating and exploiting natural resources and destroying the environment and the livelihood of local communities.

A real revolution? Protest leader Armen Grigoryan on what’s happening in Armenia

Armenia’s protest movement is going from strength to strength. I spoke to one of its leaders to find out how they made it happen.

Amber Rudd resigns, the anti-migrant machine works on

Hardline policies have failed in their stated aim of reducing immigration. Is their true purpose to impress particular voters? 

Young, trans Nigerians: ‘people need to see that we exist’

It may become harder for church and state to deny that trans Nigerians exist, thanks to activists like Miss saHHara.

The beauty of a both/and mind

How can we find our way out of the impasse that stymies action on the really big issues of the day?

Madrid as a place of democratic innovation

An exuberant ecosystem of citizen practices and self-managed spaces has turned Madrid into an international reference of the urban commons. Español, Português

How to contain the hard right

The question is, why do even the most enlightened liberals such as Fawcett and Barnett not really try to offer a set of specific policies to forge a liberal comeback?

Relaunching French – a very messy business

Like-minded thinkers find it rather depressing that the Francophone equivalent of the battle Salman Rushdie fought 30 years ago – against the concept of “Commonwealth literature” – has yet to commence.