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Sunny Hundal is openDemocracy’s social media editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

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Updated: 1 day 16 hours ago

Now more than ever, feminist organizations need to deepen the search for autonomous resourcing models that work for our movements, on our own terms.

Within the human rights community, there is a growing enthusiasm for new narratives to build public support for human rights. But creating a new narrative is about more than language and framing.

Oppressive laws purporting to prevent cybercrime in the MENA region are robbing internet users of their basic human rights.

New developments in gene modifications make it more urgent than ever to raise societal awareness, and adopt appropriate measures to enforce existing international agreements that prevent the creation of genetically modified human beings.

Cities exercise power in many areas that touch on human rights, and growing urban inequalities mean advocates must focus more attention on municipal governments.

A simple app, developed in close co-operation with clinicians, police and other end-users, is making it easier to effectively document and prosecute sexual assault cases in Kenya and the DRC. 

Under the leadership of president elect Bolsonaro, Brazil must be poised for increased threats to public security, the environment and democratic space.

Tackling the digital gender gap means more than improving internet access—it means empowering women and girls to use online technology, preventing gender-based violence, and addressing discrimination in emerging technologies.

Civil society must improve its knowledge and use of artificial intelligence in order to limit exploitation and protect and promote civic freedoms.

The draft of a new business and human rights treaty is a good start, but needs to be strengthened to better protect victims and ensure their access to effective remedies.

On the 70th anniversary of the UDHR, claims to recognize non-human rights are advancing and pose challenges to the anthropocentrism at the heart of the human rights movement.   

There are inherent limitations in litigating health rights, but it has led to important victories, and must remain a key strategy as populism surges.

Systematic discrimination means that—despite vocational programs—many prisoners in Brazil and elsewhere end up with less opportunities than before they were incarcerated.

A Canadian company is enabling its software to be used globally to censor access to information on LGBTQ issues, in breach of international standards.

In the last few years, public interest litigation at India’s Supreme Court has brought significant wins for human rights—but success is best assured when litigation is linked to broader mobilization. 

There are many good reasons to pursue human rights claims in the courts, especially given the rise of illiberal regimes; not least, it is simply the right thing to do.  

In the absence of sufficient monitoring and ameliorative action on the part of the tech companies, fake news in Sri Lanka is provoking non-violent, law-abiding people into hate-filled and violent acts.

As discriminatory policies gain greater political support, will the courts be a bulwark to protect human rights, or is it naïve to expect judicial rulings will stem the populist tide?     

In an increasingly authoritarian world, courts are among the few spaces where ordinary people can challenge power, voice dissent, and apply independent scrutiny.

The Indian Supreme Court’s landmark decision to declare unconstitutional a colonial-era law criminalizing same-sex relations shows majoritarian prejudices must bow to fundamental human rights.