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Picturing hope: lives of the global HIV+

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Many of the everyday aspects of life can pose tremendous challenges to anyone living with HIV, regardless of gender, economic status, or country. But coping with these challenges can be especially difficult for children in developing countries who have been impacted by Aids and lack access to even adequate health and social services.

Even in situations where children get some form of care and support, their psychological and personal growth is often left underdeveloped or even ignored. These children can feel scared and alone, without a sense of belonging, lacking a voice with which to reach out for others.

Picturing Hope provides these children with an outlet for their view on the world. By first teaching children how to engage with photographs, then sending them out into the community with donated cameras to capture their lives, the children are given an opportunity to demonstrate through words and images that they are special, they are unique, they are not alone, and they have a future.


A young boy plays to the camera in his schoolyard in Burkina Faso. Taken by Moussa, aged 16.


A young girl stands with the help of her father and uncle in Burkina Faso. If you look closely at this image you will see the shape of a halo and angel wings behind the child. Taken by Moussa, aged 16.


Young boy playing with his friends on the street in Burkina Faso. Taken by Moussa, aged 16.


A woman sells chickens on the street in Vijawada, India. Taken by Meroz.


Children from Vijayawada India, a city dramatically affected by HIV/Aids. Taken by Meroz.


Portrait of boys that work as "ragpickers", children that collect paper and plastic in an attempt to make money for food. Taken by Ramu.


This portrait is of a couple that lives near the photographer. Taken by Revathi, age 14.


Children play in the street in Vijawada, India. Taken by Revathi, age 14.


Shadows of young photographers living in a group home in Constanta, Romania. Taken by Andrei, age 18.


A man looking out on the Black Sea reflected in a window. Taken by Marian, age 15.


An orphan living in a group home in Constantan, Romania, photographs his roommates. Taken by Razvan, age 17.


Three girls playing in their dormitory at the Kurasini Children's Home in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Taken by Asha, age 12.


A portrait of a young orphan living at the Kurasini Children's Home in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Taken by Diana, age 9.


Children from the Kurasini Children's Home in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania rush to pose for the camera. Taken by Furaha, age 13.


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