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About Adam Lent

Adam Lent is the European Director of Research and Innovation for Ashoka - the global network of over 3,000 leading social innovators and entrepreneurs. Previousy he was Head of Economics at the UK Trades Union Congress, Director of the RSA's Action and Research Centre, and a Research Fellow in the Department of Politics at Sheffield University.

Articles by Adam Lent

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Centrists must embrace anti-elitism or face extinction.

Instead of aping chauvinism, centrists must respond imaginatively to the anti-political sentiment behind Brexit and the rise of far right parties.

Democracy by trust

A democratic deficit cannot be remedied by forcing citizens to vote, says Adam Lent, research director of the Power inquiry.

The Power of the concordat: a reply to John Jackson and Stuart Weir

In advocating a written constitution rather than achievable reforms, critics of a plan to revive Britain's fading democracy are making the best the enemy of the good, says Adam Lent

The Vision Thing: a response to Cancúnblog

The lesson of openDemocracy’s debate on the fallout from the Cancún summit is that campaigners for global change who want to move from protest to power need to extend their sights beyond the short term and single issue.

The need to connect - a response to Roger Scruton

Roger Scruton is right to bring fox-hunting and gay rights into a common frame of reference, but his political partiality blinds him to the changing character of protest movements in the context of history and global politics.

Tomorrow the world? The rocky path of social movements

From Stop the War to Save the Whale, from Liberty and Livelihood to Globalise Resistance, popular movements of protest and advocacy are a key feature of the political landscape. Why do they grow or fail? How will the movement for global change respond to the lessons of its early years?Tomorrow the world? The rocky path of social movements
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