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About Amal de Chickera

Amal de Chickera is a co-founder and co-director of the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion.

 

  

Articles by Amal de Chickera

This week's editor

“Claire

Claire Provost is editor of 50.50 covering gender, sexuality and social justice.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Will Nepal give equal citizenship rights to women?

Nepali women are treated as second-class citizens, due to discriminatory nationality law. 

The Rohingya refugee making factory

If the production of refugees was an industry, Myanmar would be among the world’s market leaders. And of all its products the Rohingya would be one of the most lucrative. A niche but growing market of global proportions, the culmination of decades of tireless endeavour to hone a specialist craft.

The Rohingya: bargaining with human lives

One year on from the violence of June 2012, new empirical evidence about the treatment of the Rohingya in Rakhine State, Burma, has taken the issue from the realms of international human rights and humanitarian law to that of international criminal law, says Amal de Chickera.

Stateless in Burma: Rohingya word wars

In order to understand how the ‘Rohingya crisis’ has come to pass we need to consider the narrative built by three groupings of international actors - the Burmese government, host countries for Rohingya who have fled and the international community at large.

The Games have begun, an opportunity missed

It was an amazing opening ceremony. Danny Boyle and his team had the opportunity at the outset, to challenge some of the more dominant, ugly trends that have taken over the Olympics. Acknowledgement of the injustice of colonisation would have gone a long way to set the right tone for the games. They failed. But perhaps I expected too much, says Amal de Chickera .

How to protect 'invisible' people

Around 12 million people in the world are stateless, and many find themselves locked up for long periods of time under immigration regulations that don’t apply to them. States need to be reminded of their obligations under international human rights law and stop the arbitrary detention of stateless persons, says Amal de Chickera
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