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About Amr Osman

Amr Osman is an assistant professor of history at Qatar University (currently post-doctoral fellow at the Forum Transregionale Studien in Berlin). His BA was in political science (American University in Cairo, 2000), MPhil in History (University of St. Andrews, 2004), and PhD in Near Eastern Studies (Princeton University, 2010).

Articles by Amr Osman

This week’s front page editor

Clare Sambrook

Clare Sambrook, investigative journalist, co-edits Shine a Light.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Egypt’s deep state rediscovers itself

It is now evident that the coup has not taken Egypt any step closer to a 'real state' where the supreme authority lies within its elected legislature, issuing laws and holding the government to account. On the contrary, the coup has deepened the roots of the deep state, resulting in an entity that is far from modern. 

Sister revolution and its shadow twin, counter-revolution

From the start, the revolution was not supported by a significant part of the Egyptian society, a fact that does not seem to have sunk in with anyone except the old regime.

General El Sisi and the red sword

General El Sisi sincerely believes that he is engaging in a holy war, either in the name of God or the name of the Egyptian “people”, which now does not include the Muslim Brotherhood or any person who rejects the coup.

Religion and politics in post-coup Egypt

How have the highest religious authorities in Egypt reacted to the conflict between Egypt's military and the Muslim Brotherhood, and what does this tell us about the part they play in Egypt's unfolding destiny and the changing roles of religion and politics?

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