About Bernard Rorke

Bernard Rorke was born in Dublin and has lived in Budapest since 1997. He  has an MSc in Politics and Sociology from Birkbeck College, University of London and a PhD from the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster. He has been active on Roma issues for over 15 years.

Articles by Bernard Rorke

This week's editor

Mary Fitzgerald

Mary Fitzgerald is Editor-in-Chief of openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Anti-Gypsyism 25 years on: Europe fails Havel’s litmus test

Twenty-five years after the fall of communism, it still hasn't sunk in that racism and exclusion is not a ‘Gypsy problem’ but a 'Europe problem'.

Hungary's Fidesz and its 'Jewish Question'

Hungary’s Fidesz government may not have pursued a state-sponsored policy of anti-Semitism. However, it has indulged in outrageous historical revisionism; failed to censure anti-Semitism from high within its own ranks; and screwed up its official commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the Holocaust in Hungary.

Roma integration and 'a normal way of living'

Roma integration in Europe has shifted to a right-wing definition of integration where the onus is being placed on the minorities to make the adjustments and accommodations deemed necessary for social cohesion.

National Roma integration strategies failing Romani children

Newly published reports on Roma integration strategies show little signs of tangible progress in 2012, especially in addressing the rights and well-being of Roma youth. European Union member states must act soon to prevent another ‘lost generation’ of Roma.

Hate is where the heart is: Time for Europe to confront anti-Gypsyism

It is time for the European Union to officially recognize anti-Gypsyism as a long-standing and deeply rooted form of European prejudice.

Roma inclusion in 2012: no respite in prejudice

Does the EU deserve its Nobel Peace Prize? 2013 is the European Year of Citizens, dedicated to the rights that come with EU citizenship. It seems utterly remote and removed from the reality facing millions of Roma across the Union.  

The Roma rights dilemma of the French left

On the Roma issue, the French left must choose: whether to align itself with the forces of progress to combat anti-Roma racism and exclusion; or persist with evictions and expulsions, and find itself bedded down with Europe’s forces of reactionary populism.

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