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About Brandt Goldstein

Brandt Goldstein is an attorney and author of Storming the Court: How a Band of Yale Law Students Sued the President - and Won (Scribner, 2005). He graduated from Yale Law School in 1992, served as a law clerk on the US Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and practiced law for several years in Washington, D.C. His articles have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and elsewhere.

Articles by Brandt Goldstein

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Guantánamo: land without law

In the early 1990s, a campaign by Yale University law students – going all the way to the Supreme Court – helped free 300 Haitian refugees held without trial at Guantánamo. A classmate of those students, Brandt Goldstein, tells an extraordinary story from the prehistory of the “war on terror”.

Storming the Supreme Court: a students' odyssey

Brandt Goldstein’s “Storming the Court: How a Band of Yale Law Students Sued the President – and Won” traces the campaign by a group of Yale University students in the early 1990s to free Haitian refugees held at the United States’s naval base in Guantánamo Bay, on the eastern tip of Cuba. This extract from the book begins after a federal judge has ordered the US department of justice to grant the students access to their Haitian clients. Now, they must wake up before first light to take a military aircraft to Cuba...

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