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About Burcu Kilic

Burcu Kilic is an expert on legal, economic and political issues surrounding intellectual property law & policy, trade, information technology, development and innovation. She provides technical and legal assistance to governments and civil society groups around the world and promotes their participation in international rule making. She was the first to develop insightful analyses for policymakers, scholars and activists of trade agreements including for the TPP, TTIP, TISA and RCEP.  She completed her Ph.D. at Queen Mary, University of London as a School of Law Fellow, where she taught International and Comparative Patent Law and Policy. She holds degrees from University of London, Stockholm University, and Ankara University and is a SARChI Research Fellow at Institute for Economic Research on Innovation, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa.

Articles by Burcu Kilic

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Digital giants are trading away our right to privacy

Today, the big tech race is for data extractivism from those yet to be 'connected' in the world – tech companies will use all their power to achieve a global regime in which small nations cannot regulate either data extraction or localisation. 

Cuando lo que se negocia es nuestra privacidad: la Ministerial de la OMC en Buenos Aires

Si los países del hemisferio Sur quieren prepararse para librar guerras de datos, deberían empezar a pensar en cómo reducir el control de las grandes compañías tecnológicas. English

Trading away our Privacy; the WTO Ministerial in Buenos Aires

If countries from the Global South want to prepare for data wars, they should start thinking about how to reduce the overwhelming control of Big Tech. Español

A new digital trade agenda: are we giving away the Internet?

Will this foster digital rights, or leave us with even lower standards and a concentrated, quasi-monopolistic market benefiting from public infrastructure?

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