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About Carla Ferstman

Carla Ferstman is director of Redress, a London-based international charity that seeks justice and reparation for torture survivors. She has previously worked with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. She has an LL.B. from the University of British Columbia, an LL.M. from New York University and a DPhil from the University of Oxford. She has published and is a regular commentator on victims' rights, the International Criminal Court, and the prohibition against torture.

 

Articles by Carla Ferstman

This week's editor

“Phoebe

Phoebe Braithwaite is openDemocracy’s submissions editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Why the ICC examination into torture and other abuses by UK soldiers in Iraq must continue

The Office of the Prosecutor is under pressure to conclude the examination. It must remain open. The Prosecutor should be taking it to the next logical step – a full-blown investigation. 

The fight against torture should preoccupy us all

Torture is a calculated act of cruelty and brutality that degrades us all and weakens the rule of law. On International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, let's eradicate complicity with torture.

Should international courts exempt African leaders and their senior officials from genocide and war crimes prosecution?

The fact that some still seem to be above the law, now appears to be used to form the argument that all should be above the law. What is on the table at the African Union this week is the legalisation of impunity.

"Gentleman at home, hoodlums elsewhere": Britain's approach to human rights abroad

A European Court case into the deaths of Iraqi civilians caused, or said to be cause, by British soldiers, recently published its judgement. The judges found that the UK Government were operating on double standards, under the guise of opposition to "human rights imperialism"

Against impunity: justice after torture

The case of four British citizens incarcerated in Saudi Arabia highlights the importance of opening a legal route to redress for torture survivors, says Carla Ferstman.
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