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About Charles Tripp

Charles Tripp is professor of middle east politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Among his books are A History of Iraq (Cambridge University Press, new edition, 2007), Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and the forthcoming, 'The Power and the People: paths of resistance in the Middle East' (Cambridge University Press, 2012)

Articles by Charles Tripp

This week’s front page editor

“Adam

Adam Bychawski is an editorial assistant at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Event: Culture, Creativity and Non-Violence (London, May 1st)

In the third and final event in our ‘Tahrir Square Meme’ series, Charles Tripp, professor of middle east politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, will be exploring whether a new form of counter hegemony is emerging in the Middle East and its relationship to non-violence and political pluralism.

The seductions of violence in Iraq

Violence in Iraq is not a throw-back to some more ‘primitive’ past, driven by dark passions dredged up from history.  On the contrary, it has a logic and a constitutive power of its own fully in line with the contemporary experiences that Iraqis have undergone both before and after 2003. Moreover, it seems to be regarded by those in power as a good deal less troubling than public accountability.

The middle east: reporters under fire

From Iraq to Egypt, Tunisia to Iran, those who speak truth to power incur danger from its representatives - insurgents, governments and religious authorities, says Charles Tripp. 

Iraq: the politics of the local

The United States military's cultivation of local forms of power in Iraq creates the potential for the emergence of an Iraqi politics in the next period very different from the kind Washington seeks, says Charles Tripp.

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