only search openDemocracy.net

About Charlie Devereux

Charlie Devereux is a freelance journalist and photographer. He was a member of the openDemocracy editorial team from August to December 2005

Articles by Charlie Devereux

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Photography for the majority world

Can the western media hegemony be broken? Charlie Devereux talks to Suvenda Chatterjee, director of the Drik photography agency, about a new photographic vision for the world.

Afghan revival

Amidst ongoing violence and fragile politics, how has independent reportage fared in post-Taliban Afghanistan? Charlie Devereux talks to world-renowned photojournalist Reza about his Kabul-based NGO Aïna and ambitions to construct a free Afghan media.

Bhutan's outsiders in limbo

The harsh conditions endured by the Lhotshampa minority in Bhutan are a stain on the Himalayan kingdom's harmonious image. They may also become a threat to regional security, reports Charlie Devereux.

The making of the Man in Black

James Mangold’s film portrayal of Johnny Cash in "Walk The Line" gives insight into the musician’s transition to artistic maturity, but for Charlie Devereux, the story it omits is just as interesting.

'Unbecoming Citizens,' Michael Hutt

"A rare case study of the dynamics of nationalism in the Himalayas"

Chechnya: elections vs reality

A Russian-sponsored vote in the ruined north Caucasus republic is an evasion of its people’s real needs, says a new human-rights report.

The tyrant's flaw: Geoffrey Robertson interviewed

The prosecutor of England’s king, Charles I, in 1649 conceived the modern principle of holding tyrants legally to account for their violations. The human-rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson tells openDemocracy’s Charlie Devereux why he regards John Cooke as a hero for our time.

'The Tyrannicide Brief': an extract

The radical lawyer John Cooke prosecuted England’s king, Charles I, in 1649 – and in doing so opened a chapter in legal history that reverberates 356 years later. Geoffrey Robertson, in an extract from his book “The Tyrannicide Brief”, describes Cooke’s pivotal role and assesses its modern implications.

Liberia's election: changing the picture?

As the votes are counted in Liberia’s historic presidential election, Charlie Devereux speaks to award-winning photographer and Monrovia resident Tim Hetherington about his images of and hopes for the troubled state.

Syndicate content