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About Dawn Chatty

Dawn Chatty is emeritus professor of anthropology and forced migration in the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, and former director of the centre, 2011-2014. She is the author of an online resource for the study of nomadic life in Oman, Nomads in Oman. Among her books are Displacement and Dispossession in the Modern Midde East, Dispossession and Displacement: Forced Migration in the Middle East and North Africa (edited with Bill Finlayson), and Deterritorialized Youth: Sahrawi and Afghan Refugees at the Margins of the Middle East (as editor).

Articles by Dawn Chatty

This week’s front page editor

“Adam

Adam Bychawski is an editorial assistant at openDemocracy.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The aid crisis for Syrian refugees

As the war is prolonged, families are exhausting their savings. Without a massive re-thinking of how aid is delivered and distributed, refugees in the region are going to look for ways to leave.

For young refugees from Syria, education equals hope

Young Syrian refugees have shown extradordinary resilience, but hope for their short and long-term futures hinges on better educational opportunities.

High time for Europe to offer temporary protection to refugees from Syria?

The 2001 Temporary Protection Directive - created in the wake of the Yugoslav Wars - has never been activated, but it could be part of a reasonable, compassionate response to the Syrian refugee crisis.

Syria’s dismemberment: fulfilling the French Mandate’s vision?

Could the neglected strength of the mainstream Muslim community – a vestige of the Ottoman self-governing ethno-religious millet system – hold Syria together as it did nearly 100 years ago and prevent its dismemberment into a number of mini-states?

Iraqi refugees: problems and prospects

Iraqi refugees in neighbouring Arab states are unwilling to return to their country and unable to emigrate further west. Their perilous situation needs to be addressed by the powers who created this humanitarian crisis, says Dawn Chatty.

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