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About Dom Shaw

Dom Shaw is a writer and filmmaker. He won the 1982 Grierson Award for Best Documentary for co-directing the seminal post-punk documentary “Rough Cut & Ready Dubbed” and has written for the BBC and ITV. His first novel, “Eric is Awake” is on sale now. Follow him on @papadom2

Articles by Dom Shaw

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Can we really be bothered to take back our privacy?

Is the best we can do really to download countless programs merely to slow down those spying on us? This is not only wrong on principle. It's also a lot of effort. People can't be bothered.

The prevention of journalism

Governments may use increasingly complex and sophisticated tools for censoring unhelpful information but the end result is always the same, despite the claims of toadying journalists.

The Orwellian arithmetic of mass surveillance

The justifications for indiscriminant mass surveillance are becoming increasingly absurd. False calls to patriotism and unwavering professionalism are entirely at odds with known reality - let's recall some facts.

Where to stand in the Fourth Estate

Attacks on the Guardian's supposed hypocrisy conflates public scrutiny with gossip and entertainment. 

The power of the boycott

David Cameron has refused to heed calls for Britain to boycott the Winter Olympics in Russia because of the latter’s anti-homosexual laws. We need to return to the exemplar of sports boycotts – South Africa.

NSA & GCHQ - hand in glove. Are you really surprised?

The level of surveillance across the US and the UK should not come as a shock to their citizens. To what extent is the nature of these actions rooted in history? Would even the most benevolent of governments be able to stop the constant monitoring of its citizens?

Orwell is drowning in data: the volume problem

In the Orwellian imagination, the fundamental flaw in state intrusion lay in overwhelming layers of bureaucracy. Dom Shaw reveals how late capitalism’s intersection of government administration and corporate interests has solved this ‘volume problem’.

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