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About Fadia Faqir

Fadia Faqir is a Jordanian British author based in Durham and Amman. She currently holds a writing fellowship at St Aidan’s College, the University of Durham, where she teaches creative writing. Her novels have been published in nineteen countries and translated into fifteen languages.  Faqir often writes on issues of gender, Islam and democracy. Her most recent novel is Willow Trees Don’t Weep (Heron Books, March, 2014). She tweets @fadiafaqir

Articles by Fadia Faqir

This week's editor

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

An Arab perspective on Channel 4’s "The State"

A review of Channel 4's "The State", a show that takes ISIS as its subject and Syria as its backdrop. But does it deliver on its promises?

Simmering tensions: Behind the facade of Amman

Jordan appears to have been relatively unaffected by the upheavals of the Arab uprisings, but growing resentment at nepotism, pandemic corruption, and economic deprivation lies just beneath the surface. 

Where is the 'W' factor? Women and the war on Afghanistan

Since 11 September, the images of the war against terror which have been presented to us by the hegemonic western media are predominantly masculine on all sides: George Bush, Colin Powell, Tony Blair, Mohammad Atta, Osama Bin Laden and the male soldiers launching the missiles to smoke out the terrorist. Again and again men have appeared on our TV screens, flexing their muscles, raising their rhetoric to put fear in the heart of their enemy.

The terrorists may still be hiding out in caves, but the caveman mentality is widespread among all the participants in this war.

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