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About Franco Galdini

Franco Galdini is a freelance journalist and analyst.

Articles by Franco Galdini

This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Islam in Kyrgyzstan: growing in diversity

Since the late 1980s, Kyrgyzstan has witnessed an Islamic revival. Recent talk of extremist threats and radicalisation obscures the real picture. Русский

Searching for a new debate on immigration in Europe

In the current debate on immigration in Europe, confusion and populist bias came to the fore once again during the latest elections to the European Parliament. This is especially true of Italy, whose long coastline witnessed an increased number of arrivals in the first half of 2014.

There will be blood: a dispatch from Cairo, Part 2

Egypt is divided between the army’s supporters, including many a figure of the Mubarak regime, liberals and leftists, and the deposed President’s supporters. But a new movement rejects both these ways forward. Franco Galdini interviews founder member, Wael Gamal.

There will be blood: a dispatch from Cairo

The two competing narratives are so at loggerheads that the country risks being driven down the dangerous road of constant low-intensity conflict.

Averting all-out civil war in Syria

International diplomacy should declare its unequivocal support for the peaceful protesters and the deluge of peaceful demonstrations still flooding the streets of many Syrian cities, thus pushing for a steady shift of power relations on the ground back to the political, rather than military, realm. These demonstrations bear witness to the determination and bravery of those ordinary Syrians who are steadfast in their resolve to uphold the moral high ground vis-à-vis the regime.

Fighting to remain relevant? The PKK in 2012

The AKP has gained the support of 50 percent of the Kurdish population via cooption rather than coercion. That means that its recent crackdown on Kurdish civil society in general - and the PKK in particular - risks making the latter more popular than it actually is in the eyes of the Kurdish general public.
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