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About Hakan Altinay

Hakan Altinay is the President of the Global Civics Academy, which offers online courses on global civics. He is based in Istanbul.

حقان ألتناي هو رئيس أكاديمية التربية المدنية العالمية Global Civics Academy، والتي توفر دورات دراسية عن طريق الانترنت متخصصة في التربية المدنية العالمية. وهو مقيم في إسطنبول.

Articles by Hakan Altinay

This week’s editors

“Francesc”

Francesc Badia i Dalmases is Editor and Director of democraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Islamic ideals of peace and justice: are we overlooking something?

Associating progressive social policies with Islam may unsettle some, yet the parallels are there and offer many possibilities. A contribution to the openGlobalRights debate on religion and human rightsالعربية

قيم السلام والعدل الإسلامية: هل أغفلنا شيئاً؟

الربط بين السياسات الاجتماعية التقدمية ومفاهيم الدين الإسلامي قد يؤرق البعض، ولكن أوجه الشبه متواجدة ومتاحة وتوفر العديد من الفرص. مساهمة من الجدل المطروح في openGlobalRights حول الدين وحقوق الإنسان. English

The myopia of human rights

The legalism of the human rights framework makes it blind to the cooperation and sense of civic responsibility that truly makes us human and accounts for our uniqueness.

An academy for global civics

In order to navigate our increasing interdependence, we need a mental map to help us decide what sort of a rapport we wish to have with billions of others with whom we share our planet and destinies, but not our citizenship. And for that we need forums.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan: the Mandela test

Turkey's dangerous pre-election political division places a special responsibility on the country's prime minister, says Hakan Altinay.

Why the European Union strengthens Turkish secularism

Many Turkish secularists are becoming ever more critical of the European Union. They should think again, say a group of prominent intellectuals led by Hakan Altinay & Kalypso Nicolaïdis: for there are seven ways in which Europe can still be an agent of Turkey's secularist progress.
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