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About The Institute of Art and Ideas

The Institute of Art and Ideas (IAI) is a not-for-profit organisation, which aims to create an open, vibrant intellectual culture through events and online video broadcasting.

Articles by The Institute of Art and Ideas

This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Sisters and the sisterhood: a video debate with Kimberlé Crenshaw and others

As Women's Marches take place around the world, listen to civil rights advocate Kimberle Crenshaw, CEO Margaret Heffernan and journalist Myriam Francois debate feminism, class and solidarity. 

Video debate - the wealth delusion

Do we need a more equal society, and a global tax on wealth, or does wealth benefit us all as a driver of investment and growth?

Video debate: the housing crisis - a very British disease.

Would we be more innovative and prosperous if property was not a national obsession?

Video debate: is paying tax a moral duty?

Labour politican Diane Abbot, philosopher Jamie Whyte and former Liberal Democrat minister Chris Huhne debate a current heresy.

Video debate - Owning the world

Companies now own forms of life and fewer people own more and more. Is it time to consider radical limits to ownership in search of a fairer, more equal society?

Video debate: beyond left and right

Since the French Revolution, the left-right divide has defined the political map. But is it still relevant? Hilary Benn, Peter Oborne, Michael Howard and Pippa Malmgren discuss.

Video debate - Russia, China and the New World Order

China may be on the way to replacing the US as the world's dominant economic power, but with Russia also growing its reach, could the future be more dangerous still?

The open society and its enemies

Oligarchs and government spies know where we are, what we want, and even our innermost thoughts. Who can protect us? Are whistleblowers like Snowden the white knights of the digital age? Or is the pursuit of radical openness itself the real threat we face? (Video debate, 32 minutes)

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