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About John Kay

John Kay is the former director of Said Business School at the University of Oxford. He is an acclaimed author on economics and business and a regular columnist for the Financial Times since 1995. His career has spanned think tanks, consultancies, business, and investment companies.

Articles by John Kay

This week’s World Forum for Democracy 2017 editors

Georgios Kolliarakis

Georgios Kolliarakis political scientist, is a senior researcher at the University of Frankfurt.

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Introducing this week’s theme: Media, parties and populism.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Liberty for Scotland: the next steps

As the date of the vote for the Scottish Referendum stands firmly on the horizon, John Kay addresses the concrete steps that would need to be considered for a successful economic transition to be a prosperous, independent state in this speech at University of Glasgow.

Putting the 'American business model' in its place

The key to understanding why market economies have outperformed planned societies is not recognition of the ubiquity of greed, but understanding of the power of disciplined pluralism. (This article is part of an IPPR series more of which can be read here)

The future of markets

1989 marked the victory of markets over vested interests: 2009 has witnessed the reverse. Market power needs to be tackled in ways economists have ignored. We thank John Kay and the Wincott Foundation for permission to reprint in full the 2009 Wincott Lecture given on October 20.

In Swell Oil we trust

Are transparency and honesty, rather than the fashionable notion of corporate social responsibility, the best ways to business success? Sir Luke Very-Moody, Chairman of the Swell Oil Company thinks so. In the draft of a speech exclusively leaked to John Kay, Sir Luke celebrates the first gush of oil production in the African country of Couldbericha by reasserting the need for business to follow its own values and leave moral standards to be written by the people it serves.
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