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About Paul Gilroy

Professor Paul Gilroy joined Kings College, London in September 2012 having previously been Giddens Professor of Social Theory at the London School of Economics (2005-2012), Charlotte Marian Saden Professor of African American Studies and Sociology at Yale (1999-2005) and Professor of Cultural Studies and Sociology at Goldsmiths College (1995-1999). He is author of Between Camps (published in the USA as Against Race) and The Black Atlantic.

Articles by Paul Gilroy

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Paul Gilroy in search of a not necessarily safe starting point…

A conversation about university education today that rearranges some of the deckchairs on the Titanic.

Husby and territorial stigma in Sweden

This statement appeared at the beginning of June in the Swedish broadsheet SVD, calling for a public investigation into the recent uprisings in Swedish suburbs.

A hundred years of bombing: what has it done to us?

November 2011 marks the centenary of a world-historic event. An Italian pilot, Guilio Cavotti dropped the first bombs from an aeroplane on to the oasis of Tagiura outside Tripoli. The development of aerial bombardment was more than just a military revolution. It changed both war and peace. openDemocracy is the media partner for Shock and Awe: a hundred years of bombing from above and this is an invitation to a debate.

Melancholia and multiculture

In the first of a series tracing “the strange career of multiculturalism”, Paul Gilroy – leading thinker on race and racism, and currently chair of African American studies at Yale University – surveys the current debate in Britain, and calls for an end to its entrapment by “the problem of assimilation”.

Contemporary discussions of multiculturalism, such as the recent debate in Britain triggered by editor of Prospect magazine David Goodhart, have been horribly disto

England's fantasy

It is 12 January 2003 and US president Bush has rallied his troops for what he calls “The first war of the 21st century”. What is your view of this crisis, where, briefly, do you stand? This is the question we are putting to people around the world, especially those with their own public reputation and following. Our aim, to help create a truly global debate all can identify with.

Raise your eyes

As we remember the dead, we face a fundamental choice. We can feed our fears of the clash of civilisations. Or we can enter a new global era and build on our shared sense of the fragility, and diversity, of human life. Our grasp of the history of racism may play a crucial role.

Neither Jews nor Germans: where is liberalism taking us?

Paul Gilroy’s work, “Between Camps: Nations, Cultures and the Allure of Race”, challenges the way that categories of ‘race’ are routinely used and proposes an audacious new binding concept of ‘planetary humanism’. He elaborates the argument in an interview with Anthony Barnett, Bola Gibson and Caspar Melville of openDemocracy.

Ali G and the Oscars

In a scintillating panorama, Paul Gilroy examines western multiculturalism after 11 September – from redemption at Hollywood’s Oscars to Ali G, slipping between sad joke and protean satire.

Diving into the tunnel: the politics of race between old and new worlds

The would-be shoebomber Richard Reid, and several of the prisoners of Guantanamo Bay, are the products of ‘multicultural’ Britain. The foremost scholar of the phenomenon sees their journey to militant Islam as emblematic of the untruths buried in a now-failing social model and an unresolved post-colonial European history.

The American Jihad

The disturbing reaction to the attacks of 11 September by would-be warmongers betrays an urge to seize and politicise them in ways that resonate with untruth, says Paul Gilroy.
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