only search openDemocracy.net

About Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers is professor in the department of peace studies at Bradford University, northern England. He is openDemocracy's international security editor, and has been writing a weekly column on global security since 28 September 2001; he also writes a monthly briefing for the Oxford Research Group. His latest book is Irregular War: ISIS and the New Threat from the Margins (IB Tauris, 2016), which follows Why We’re Losing the War on Terror (Polity, 2007), and Losing Control: Global Security in the 21st Century (Pluto Press, 3rd edition, 2010). He is on Twitter at: @ProfPRogers

A lecture by Paul Rogers, delivered to the Food Systems Academy in late 2014, provides an overview of the analysis that underpins his openDemocracy column. The lecture - "The crucial century, 1945-2045: transforming food systems in a global context" - focuses on the central place of food systems in human security worldwide. Paul argues that food is the pivot of humanity's next great transition. It can be accessed here

Articles by Paul Rogers

This week's editor

En Liang Khong

En Liang Khong is openDemocracy’s assistant editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

After Mosul, what?

Amid a bitter contest for Iraq's second city, Baghdad's sectarian militias and Washington's new order cast a shadow over the future.

Trump's Afghan test

The trend of events in Afghanistan, as much as in Washington, makes the aim of crushing ISIS look even more remote.

Trump on the offensive

A surge in America's military power, led by special forces and new weapons, augurs an even more dangerous era in global security.

Theresa May, Donald Trump and the wars to come

The new American regime embraces a dangerous militarism. Britain's government supports the policy at its own risk.

ISIS: worst of times, best of times

The insurgents of ISIS are under pressure in their strongholds. But over the long term they have grounds for confidence.

The wrongs of counter-violence

In the event of a major ISIS-inspired action in Britain, what principles do far-sighted – and brave – politicians need to observe?

A nuclear world: eight-and-a half rogue states

When disarmament looks remote, straight talking on possession of nuclear weapons is all the more timely.

Letters from Raqqa, 2014-16

How does ISIS see its struggle? Paul Rogers has written ten letters as if from a young, committed operative with the group. They are collected here, with the author's overview.

War and peace, a tale of two museums

The city of Bradford has Britain's only dedicated peace museum. But seek other sites upholding peace and a better world, and ye shall find! 

The war through Raqqa's eyes

A series of letters has imagined the outlook of a young ISIS operative on the long war. How accurate is his view?

Islamic State: writing from Raqqa

A regular correspondent from the IS capital sends a letter to a friend in Baghdad, in the latest of a series imagined by Paul Rogers.

The Zeus complex: against air war

An innovative study of aerial bombardment brings history, state power, civilians and human rights into a single frame.

Trump's day one: in crisis mode

The president-elect's hope is to follow an "America first" path to domestic renewal. Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya may puncture it. 

Trump and the Pentagon

Under the president-elect, America's military can expect more of everything. What then?

Trump in context

The American election result can fruitfully be seen in a global context, as an expression of 'revolts from the margins' that arise in response to a failed economic system.

Mosul and Aleppo, a reshaping war

The intense aerial assaults in Iraq and Syria are being seized as an opportunity by forces, both ISIS and other jihadi, on the receiving end.

Irregular war, and how to reverse it

A military-led response to violent movements such as ISIS and al-Qaida misses the wider global forces that are triggering their rise.

ISIS's squeeze, al-Qaida's return

Aleppo burns and Mosul reels. But in the background, yet more conflicts are incubating.

Russia and the west: risks of hype

An inflated view of Russia's power, influenced by its role in Syria, could hasten further destructive conflict.

Mosul, the next target

The complex military operation to seize Iraq's second city from ISIS's grip is a microcosm of the long war.

ISIS against, and in, the west

The retreat of the caliphate in Iraq-Syria signals a new phase in the 30-year war.

The thirty-year war: still on track

A judgment made during the chaotic invasion of Iraq in 2003 sadly needs no revision.

America's new war: drone to death-ray

Washington's move to limit proliferation of armed drones is part of its search for a sharper military-technological edge.

The Corbyn crowd, and its signal

What is really going on in Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party? An open-air meeting and the changes in a ward branch give some clues.

Afghanistan, dynamic of war

A renewed Taliban offensive is forcing Washington to bolster Kabul. Fifteen years after 9/11, the conflict has turned full circle.

Adam Curle, peace scholar: a centenary symposium

Bradford University's pioneering department devoted to peace education and research is honouring its founding professor. The world's conflicts make it a timely event.

Syria-Iraq and beyond: octopus wars

Only a change of dynamic towards diplomacy can offer an alternative to endless conflict in the Middle East.

Climate science: revolution is here

A host of innovations in energy technology is transforming the climate-change outlook – one of the world's three required paradigm shifts.

ISIS's war: real to virtual, far to near

A series of attacks beyond its core territory reveals Islamic State's capacity to adapt and to plan for the long term.

Raqqa to the world: a letter

How might a young British adherent of ISIS, now in Syria, see the intensifying war? The latest letter in a series imagined by Paul Rogers.                       

Britain's nuclear-weapons future: no done deal

A new British nuclear arsenal will face great obstacles. Not least: is it legal?

What Labour should do now

To make a real difference, Britain's Labour Party should be bold and think big.

Chilcot's Iraq: the missing piece

The response to a major report on Britain's role in Iraq needs to grasp how war itself is changing. 

After Brexit, a time for new thinking

Britain's vote to leave the European Union comes at a critical time for three major global security challenges.

The climate pioneers: look south

A potential low-carbon revolution is taking shape in the global south. But it needs funding support to achieve development lift-off.

Syndicate content