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About Richard Norton-Taylor

Richard Norton-Taylor is a former security and defence editor at the Guardian. His books include In Defence of the Realm ? The case for Accountable Security and Intelligence Services, Truth is A Difficult Concept: Inside the Scott Inquiry. He has written a number of award-winning plays, including Half the Picture, The Colour of Justice, Justifying War, Bloody Sunday, Called to Account, and Chilcot. He is on the board of Liberty, the National Council for Civil Liberties. He has twice won the Freedom of Information Campaign awards.

 

Articles by Richard Norton-Taylor

This week’s front page editor

Thomas Rowley

Tom Rowley edits oDR.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

The Belhaj case shows British intelligence agencies are out of control

Tony Blair’s non-apology to the victim of ‘extraordinary rendition’ – and Jack Straw and Theresa May’s attempts to draw a line under the issue – raise more questions than they answer.

Ministry of Defence not fit for purpose

The MoD has a vested interest in exaggerating threats, in promoting concerns about a new cold war, in order to persuade the UK government, MPs, and the public to give it extra money.

Voices to lift our spirits

“In a protest, we’re all bystanders, we’re all there because of some attempt to marginalise us; the bystanders are the people making history.” Book review.

The battle of governments against extremism has to be credible

Byrne writes, ‘the starting point for radicalisation may in fact be rage rather than religion…it’s not the madrassa that is the problem, it’s your mates.’ Book review.

Hidden Warfare 3: Special forces

While Britain’s conventional army is being slashed, Britain’s special forces are benefiting from special treatment. Their budget was doubled in last year’s Strategic Defence and Security Review.

Drones, Baby, Drones

Drama going beyond journalism at the Arcola theatre in London, until 26 November, Box Office: 0207 503 1646

Hidden Warfare 2: Drones

In an attempt to give them a better image, the British MoD has renamed them Protector rather than Predator.

Hidden Warfare 1. Cyber

The UK agency would like to be known as on the front line defending UK interests from cyber attacks, rather than as an eavesdropping agency collecting data on individuals en masse.

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