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About Richard Youngs

Richard Youngs is senior associate on the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Democracy and Rule of Law program, and professor of international relations at Warwick University in the UK. His latest book is Europe’s Eastern Crisis: The Geopolitics of Asymmetry (Cambridge University Press, 2017). @YoungsRichard

Richard Youngs es asociado senior en el programa Carnegie Endowment for Democracy and Rule of Law de la Internacional Peace y profesor de relaciones internacionales en la Universidad de Warwick en el Reino Unido. Su último libro es Europe’s Eastern Crisis: The Geopolitics of Asymmetry (Cambridge University Press, 2017). @YoungsRichard

Articles by Richard Youngs

This week’s editors

“Francesc”

Francesc Badia i Dalmases is Editor and Director of democraciaAbierta.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

What are the meanings behind the worldwide rise in protest?

What trends can we decipher when it comes to modern protests? Is there a pattern to the grievances that helps to explain the current spike in protest? And what do we find when we compare organisational dynamics?

El aumento de la protesta en el mundo tiene múltiples significados

¿Qué tendencias podemos descifrar ante las protestas modernas? ¿Existe un patrón común en los agravios que explique el actual estallido de protestas? ¿Y qué encontramos cuando comparamos sus dinámicas organizativas? English

Can non-Western democracy help to foster political transformation?

Democratic renewal is urgently needed everywhere, and in that process all societies can learn from each other.

The European Union and Palestine: a new engagement

The European Union could play a major role in reinvigorating the Palestine-Israel peace process by aiding Palestine. But it needs to be done intelligently and with care, says Richard Youngs

Europe's energy policy: economics, ethics, geopolitics

A European Union dependent on energy supplies from states that violate human-rights norms must not abandon principle to self-interest, says Richard Youngs.
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