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About Sandro Mezzadra

Sandro Mezzadra teaches political theory at the University of Bologna and is adjunct fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society of the University of Western Sydney. In the last decade his work has particularly centered on the relations between globalization, migration and citizenship as well as on postcolonial theory and criticism. He is an active participant in the ‘post-workerist’ debate and one of the founders of the Euronomade project.

Among his books: "Diritto di fuga. Migrazioni, cittadinanza, globalizzazione" (“The right to escape: Migration, citizenship,  globalization”, ombre corte, 2006), "La condizione postcoloniale. Storia e politica nel presente globale" (“The postcolonial condition: History and politics in the global present”, ombre corte, 2008) and "Nei cantieri marxiani. Il soggetto e la sua produzione" ("In the Marxian Workshops. The subject and its Production", Manifestolibri, 2014). With Brett Neilson he is the author of "Border as Method, or, the Multiplication of Labor" (Duke University Press, 2013).

Articles by Sandro Mezzadra

This week's editor

Dawn Foster, Co-Editor

Dawn Foster is Co-Editor at 5050 and a freelance journalist.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Il dilemma di Syriza e il nostro

Gli "accordi" del 13 luglio a Bruxelles segnano la fine di un'epoca? Sì, ma certamente non nel senso indicato dal comunicato conclusivo el "vertice". EnglishFrançais.

Syriza’s dilemma, and ours

Do the “agreements” reached on July 13 mark the end of an era? Yes, but certainly not in the sense suggested by the press release of the “summit”. Italiano. Français.

The Brussels diktat: and what followed

Alexis Tsipras won the battle on a question of principle - the need for a new Europe - even if he lost the war that ensued. What are the implications for the Greek left and for Europe? (Long: 9,000 words) Français. Deutsch.

Das diktat von Brüssel: was folgt daraus?

Alexis Tsipras won the battle on a question of principle - the need for a new Europe - even if he lost the war that ensued. What are the implications for the Greek left and for Europe? (Long: 9,000 words) EnglishFrançais.

As Europe is provincialized: a reply to Etienne Balibar

Europe can make sense only insofar as it becomes a space which makes it easier to get rid of the fear that the crisis is disseminating within the social fabric, a space where it is more viable to struggle against poverty, exploitation, and discrimination.

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