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About Sian Norris

Sian Norris is a writer and feminist activist. She is the founder and director of the Bristol Women's Literature Festival, and runs the successful feminist blog sianandcrookedrib.blogspot.com. She has written for the Guardian, the Independent, the New Statesman. Her first novel, Greta and Boris: A Daring Rescue is published by Our Street and her short story, The Boys on the Bus, is available on the Kindle. Sian is currently working on a novel based around the life of Gertrude Stein. 

Articles by Sian Norris

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Living without men: women-only organising is as old as time

As long as patriarchal societies dominate, we shouldn’t be surprised to see women turning to single-sex spaces for safety and solidarity.

12 feminist authors who may not be on your college reading list – but should be

These writers and their work span the globe and its history and would complement any degree. What would you add to this list?

Pride 2017: five British LGBT writers on books that inspired them

50 years after the UK decriminalised homosexuality, authors and activists talk about literary representations of gay relationships – and more.

Books for bleak times: a reading list from six British feminists

We asked Caroline Criado-Perez, Sarah Ditum, Helen Lewis, Nimco Ali, Joanna Walsh, and Bidisha which books inspire and empower them during bleak political times.

The things I would tell you: British Muslim women speak out in new anthology

Edited by Sabrina Mahfouz, this timely collection of essays, plays, short stories and poetry celebrates the creativity and diversity of British Muslim women.

Testosterone Rex: is the hormone the essence of masculinity, or is it far more complex?

Cordelia Fine talks about her new book – and how viewing risk as a “male” characteristic can mean we overlook risks to women’s lives.

Should domestic abuse have its own law?

In the UK, there is no specific offence for 'domestic violence'. Is the law failing women seeking justice?

Through the eyes of a queer Arab man: a review of ‘Guapa’

The novel Guapa by Saleem Haddad is set in the aftermath of the 2011 revolutions. Reading it during the fall of Aleppo, on the sixth anniversary of the Arab Spring, is a moving experience.

Autumn: writing the now as we live through it

Published this autumn, Ali Smith's latest novel Autumn explores the political upheavals of summer 2016, as well as issues of love, loss, art and friendship.

I Love Dick: what makes a feminist classic?

Chris Kraus's feminist classic I Love Dick, reissued in paperback this year, confronts the reader with complex questions about what it means to be a woman artist and a sexual woman in love with a man.

The Joyce Girl and the mad wives of modernism

Annabel Abbs' debut novel explores the life of Lucia Joyce - daughter of James - whose desire for an independent life is denied, much like those of Zelda Fitzgerald and Vivienne Eliot.

Hotel: a meditation on the meaning of 'home'

Joanna Walsh’s new book, Hotel, is a memoir of the breakdown of her marriage and the difficulties in leaving a relationship; and an exploration of our relationship with and within hotels.

The Quipu project: testimonies of forced sterilisation in Peru

The mass forced sterilisations of Peruvians is one of the grave human rights violations of our time. But the practice, and its consequences, rarely receive widespread coverage and condemnation.

Ali Smith's Public Library: civic space and intimacy

The 'serious playfulness' of Ali Smith's most recent collection is underpinned by reverence for civic space and the written word. The two come together in the form of public libraries...

Fierce Attachments: feminist memoir and female relationships

The re-issue of Vivian Gornick’s memoir ‘Fierce Attachments’ highlights the rich tradition in feminist writing of taking the complexities of female relationships seriously.

Friendship and violence: the genius of Elena Ferrante

Elena Ferrante’s novels have become a word of mouth success, despite the Italian literary world’s snobbery, because they capture the complex inner world of female friendships and women’s experiences.

Sexual harassment in UK schools

Sexual bullying in the classroom rarely makes the headlines. But one in three 16-18 year old girls in the UK have experienced unwanted sexual touching at school. What does this tacit acceptance of harassment teach our children?

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