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About Theo Hobson

Theo Hobson is a theologian and writer. His books include Against Establishment: An Anglican Polemic (Darton, Longman & Todd, 2004); Anarchy, Church and Utopia: Rowan Williams on the Church (Darton, Longman & Todd, 2005); and Milton's Vision: The Birth of Christian Liberty (Continuum, 2008). His website is here

Articles by Theo Hobson

This week's editors

RB, editor

Rosemary Bechler edits openDemocracy's main site.

Parvati Nair directs the United Nations University Institute on Globalization, Culture and Mobility.

MM

Cameron Thibos edits Mediterranean Journeys in Hope.

En Liang Khong is assistant editor at openDemocracy.

Alex Sakalis is the editor of Can Europe Make It?

Constitutional conventions: best practice

An arch-visionary of Canterbury

The leading religious authority of the Church of England has disappointed many of the hopes invested in him. Rowan Williams has indeed failed to address the challenges facing the Church and the Anglican Communion, not least its historic entanglement with state power. This is the project that his successor must understand, says Theo Hobson.

The religious crisis of American liberalism

The extraordinary arc of Barack Obama’s popular appeal tells a deeper story of America: of how the relationship between liberalism and religion was forged, then frayed and broken, and how the president’s rhetoric offered the mirage of healing. Theo Hobson asks what, if anything, can be recovered from the ashes of a once-potent compact.

John Milton’s vision

To honour the English writer John Milton on the 400th anniversary of his birth is to acknowledge his persistent otherness in the country he tried to transform, says Theo Hobson.

The Anglican vision after Lambeth

The Church of England's leadership has survived a testing and divisive challenge. But the tides of history pose it a larger challenge of modernisation, says Theo Hobson.

Rowan Williams: sharia furore, Anglican future

The spiritual head of England's state church has exposed the social rupture between religion and liberalism and thus highlighted a larger identity crisis, says Theo Hobson.
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