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About Tim Hetherington

Tim A Hetherington was born in Liverpool, UK, in 1970. He started photography in 1996, and was a member of Network Photographers from 2000-2004. His interest lies in creating diverse forms of photographic communication from long-term projects, and his experiments have ranged from digital projections at the Institute of Contemporary Art in London, to fly-poster exhibitions in Lagos. Recent projects include "Healing Sport" (1999-2002), "Blind Link Project" (2000-), and "Liberia" (2003-). He is a recipient of numerous awards including a Fellowship from the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (2001), a Hasselblad grant (2002), and two World Press Photo prizes (1999 + 2001). In 2003, he worked as a cameraman, and was involved in making five films for UK and US TV. He received an award from International Documentary Association (IDA) for his work on "Liberia: An Uncivil War" (2004), and the film was awarded the Special Jury Prize at the International Documentary Film Festival in Amsterdam (IDFA). For the last five years, he has worked consistently in West Africa, where he also teaches for the British Council.

Articles by Tim Hetherington

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

After the wave

A year after the Indian Ocean tsunami struck, killing at least 250,000 people in twelve countries, two exhibitions in London document the recuperation of a devastated region. Tim Hetherington, a photojournalist, and Annie Dare, a facilitator for the participatory photography agency PhotoVoice comment on their personal experiences and introduce slideshows of images from the respective projects.

Liberia's election: changing the picture?

As the votes are counted in Liberia’s historic presidential election, Charlie Devereux speaks to award-winning photographer and Monrovia resident Tim Hetherington about his images of and hopes for the troubled state.

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