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About Tina Beattie

Tina Beattie is professor of Catholic studies at Roehampton University, England.

Articles by Tina Beattie

This week's editor

MM

Mairi Mackay is openDemocracy’s senior editor.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

2011, a year of wonder

A great scientific breakthrough is also a path to appreciating the core ingredient of our humanity, says Tina Beattie.

The Catholic church’s scandal: modern crisis, ancient roots

The sexual violation of young people within the Catholic church is the poisonous legacy of a long tradition of contempt for human sexuality in an institution which has privileged secrecy and unaccountable power over transparency and participation. But the silence and darkness revealed by the scandal must not be allowed to define the majority of Catholics who are the living church, says Tina Beattie.

Banksy in Bristol

The enigmatic urban artist Banksy has created an exhibition of his work in the main gallery-museum of his home city of Bristol in western England. This is much more than "graffiti art", says Tina Beattie: its mix of wit, anger, imagination and humanity makes it a triumph of dissenting liberality over authoritarianism.

(This article was first published on 24 June 2009)

Antichrist: the visual theology of Lars Von Trier

The Danish filmmaker’s compelling drama uses the moving image as a celluloid icon to explore the depths of the Christian unconscious and its metaphysical terrors and longings. Tina Beattie reflects on “Antichrist”.

[This essay reveals some key events in the film's narrative]

Along the precipice: visions of atheism in London

The shallow and indulgent godlessness of the new atheists is thrown into stark relief by the real thing represented in the visceral work of the painter Francis Bacon, says Tina Beattie.

The dark (k)night of a postmodern world

Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight is a parable for our time that offers a bleak insight into the moral bankruptcy of democracy in a post-9/11 world, says Tina Beattie.

Rowan Williams and sharia law

The furious media and public reaction to an address on religious law by the head of England's established church is an index of Britain's deep social crisis, says Tina Beattie.

The end of postmodernism: the “new atheists” and democracy

The conflict between science and religion promoted by secular intellectuals such as Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and Christopher Hitchens is a smokescreen. Behind it, a far more important argument about global power and justice in a post-postmodern age is becoming unavoidable, argues Tina Beattie.

Religion's cutting edge: lessons from Africa

The experience of Christian-led work for human rights and social justice in Africa poses hard questions to the anti-religious discourse of intellectuals such as Richard Dawkins, says Tina Beattie.

Religion in Britain in the Blair era

The increasing presence of faith issues in public life during Tony Blair's time in office is reflected in the messianic strain of his personal-political vision, says Tina Beattie.

Veiling the issues: a distractive debate

The face-veil worn by a small minority of Muslim women in Britain has become the site of fierce political controversy. The problem is that it is the wrong discussion, says Tina Beattie.

Pope Benedict XVI and Islam: beyond words

Pope Benedict XVI has provoked outrage in the Muslim world with a historical citation associating Islam with violence. Tina Beattie asks: was this calculated critique or well-meaning blunder?
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