only search openDemocracy.net

About Tom Lodge

Tom Lodge is professor of peace and conflict studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland. He was formerly professor of political studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. He is the author of Mandela: A Critical Life (Oxford University Press, 2006). His previous books include Politics in South Africa: From Mandela to Mbeki (Indiana University Press, 2003)

Articles by Tom Lodge

This week’s editor

Alex Sakalis, Editor

Alex Sakalis is associate editor of openDemocracy and co-edits the Can Europe Make It? page.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Mandela’s communism: why the details matter

The evidence of Nelson Mandela’s membership of the South African Communist Party in the early 1960s is clear. But what needs to be reassessed in light of it? A study of the precise chronology of Mandela’s activism and thinking at the time suggests an answer, says Tom Lodge, author of “Mandela: A Critical Life”.

Northern Ireland: between peace and reconciliation

The political agreement of 1998 marked the end of thirty years of violent conflict, but ground-level divisions in parts of Northern Ireland remain rooted and bitter. The “interface” areas are where the tensions are most severe and the work of groups seeking a deeper settlement most important, says Tom Lodge.

Nelson Mandela: assessing the icon

The former political prisoner who led South Africa beyond apartheid remains a figure of undiminished global renown. But what of the revisionist case which highlights his flaws? On Nelson Mandela's 90th birthday, Tom Lodge assesses how far the record of his political career and judgment sustains his reputation

(This article was first published on 18 July 2008)

Syndicate content