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About Zrinka Bralo

Zrinka Bralo is CEO of Migrants Organise - self-help, organising platform for migrants and refugees acting for justice. Zrinka is a refugee from Sarajevo, where she worked with leading war correspondents as a journalist during the siege in the 90s. She is a founder of Women on the Move Awards that celebrates achievements of migrant and refugee women and Executive Chair of the National Refugee Welcome Board set up in September 2015 to organise and coordinate the civil society response to refugee crisis. Zrinka Bralo, @ZrileB, zrinka@mrcf.org.uk

Articles by Zrinka Bralo

This week’s World Forum for Democracy 2017 editors

Georgios Kolliarakis

Georgios Kolliarakis political scientist, is a senior researcher at the University of Frankfurt.

Rosemary Belcher-2.jpg

Rosemary Bechler is openDemocracy’s Editor.

Introducing this week’s theme: Media, parties and populism.

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Get out and vote say immigrants. For your future and ours

Refugees and migrants test Britain’s claim to be a representative democracy, a test which Britain is not passing. 

Our 350 on BREXIT: MigrantsOrganise

“If you wish to organise, share your experience, speak out, join in actions of solidarity and welcome and connect with other communities, we are here to help."

Christmas on Lesvos – a man-made disaster

This former detention centre outside the port of Mytilini is possibly the only detention facility in the world that people are trying to get into.

Polski Sun signals hope?

"The trouble with the world is not that people know too little, but that they know so many things that aren't so" said Mark Twain and it rings very true to me when I think about the migration debate all around the world. Last week I read a very bizarre story in the Sun about 12 people who lived in the attic of an empty house in the Midlands, and how

Asylum and health: insult and injury

Shifts in access to healthcare in the UK for refugees and asylum seekers have created more than confusion. We are all implicated in the tragedies that result, and all suffer from the impact

Plastic sheets and therapeutic food

I went to the mock refugee camp in Trafalgar square this morning. The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has set up these for one day only in 20 major cities in the world to highlight the plight of people in Darfur.

I arranged to meet a newspaper journalist there who wanted to write about Refugee Week. I thought it would be good for him to see it. I completely forgot that it might not be so good for me to see it. I suddenly remembered the plastic sheets with the UNHCR logo on them all over my windows in Sarajevo. The glass on all our windows had shattered from shelling within weeks of the war starting and as the winter set in, these plastic sheets became the main feature in the city. They were part of our humanitarian aid. I did not think that the sight of plastic sheets with a logo in Trafalgar square could bring back nasty memories so fast and that I could still be affected so strongly. But I was.

Every week is refugee week...

My name is Zrinka Bralo, and I am Executive Director of Migrant and Refugee Communities Forum in London. Yesterday, I spent a day at the South Bank with many of my colleagues and fellow Londoners at the launch of Refugee Week 2008.

I often say that I have refugee week every week, not only because a long time ago I was a refugee, but also because I do support work with refugees on a daily basis. However, this week is special because The United Nations General Assembly designated 20 June as World Refugee Day to recognize and celebrate the contribution of refugees throughout the world. And that is what we did on Sunday.

A letter to the British people from a refugee activist

Asylum-seekers in Europe are agents of change as well as victims, challenging national prejudices in the name of universal values. With a radical passion undimmed by years in exile, one former refugee sees in British people’s attitudes to outsiders an evasion of truths about themselves.

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