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About Tyrell Haberkorn

Tyrell Haberkorn is a fellow in political and social change at the Australian National University. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law and Violence in Northern Thailand and is writing a history of impunity for state violence in post-absolutist Thailand.

Articles by Tyrell Haberkorn

This week's editor

Constitutional conventions: best practice

Arbitrary detention, once again, in Thailand

If madness is doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting a different outcome, the authors of Thailand’s twelfth coup since the absolute monarchy have yet to learn from Einstein’s aphorism.

Thailand, the politics of justice

The contrasting treatment of those accused of verbal insults of the monarch and those responsible for violent repression casts a sorry verdict on the process of justice in Thailand, says Tyrell Haberkorn in Bangkok.

Thailand's political transformation

The electoral victory of Pheu Thai, the party led by Thaksin Shinawatra's sister, opens a dramatic new phase in Thailand's politics. Tyrell Haberkorn maps the background, in an article first published on 14 April 2010 (archive)

In Bangkok: remembering the Tak Bai massacre

The deepening crisis in Thailand is symbolised by the lack of accountability for state violence in the country’s Muslim-majority south, says Tyrell Haberkorn.

Thailand's democratic crisis

The turbulent polarisation between "red" and "yellow" political camps in Thailand is a symptom of a deeper disorder, says Tyrell Haberkorn.

(This article was first published on 9 April 2009)

Thailand: the misrule of law

The tumultuous protests in Bangkok are also the expression of an illness in Thailand’s legal and political order, says Tyrell Haberkorn.

Thailand’s state of impunity

The incidence of extra-judicial violence before and since the coup that ousted Thaksin Shinawatra highlights the deep flaws in Thailand's governance, says Tyrell Haberkorn.
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