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Shadows of slavery III: 'Blackness' in North Africa and the Middle East

 

Shadows of slavery part two: race, colour and origins in northwest Africa and the Middle East

This second section of our collection Shadows of Slavery explores how race, colour and origins shape social dynamics and political imaginations across northwest Africa and the Middle East.

Whom should I marry? Genealogical purity and the shadows of slavery in southern Senegal

Hard choices are made when arranged marriages collide with a slave past.

The multiple roots of Emiratiness: the cosmopolitan history of Emirati society

The UAE, like many other Arabian Gulf States, claims to be home to a homogenous Arab population. In doing so it assimilates rather than acknowledges the region’s slave past.

“She is not a ‘Abid”: blackness among slave descendants in southern Tunisia

Connected first by a slave-master relationship and now by geographical proximity, the ‘white’ and ‘black’ populations of Ghbonton, Tunisia have a complex relationship with each other.

Are Haratines black Moors or just black?

The racialisation of the anti-slavery struggle in Mauritania has created a patchwork of identities and alliances.

On colour and origin: the case of the akhdam in Yemen

The shift towards a collective identity based on race has had major implications for Yemen’s most marginalised people.

“In the skin of a black”: Senegalese students and young professionals in Rabat

Even student and young professional Senegalese migrants have to navigate the legacies of slavery in Morocco as ‘Africans’.

Being 'black' in North Africa and the Middle East

Former slaves and their descendants in North Africa and the Middle East might be formally free, but the racial legacies of slavery continue to affect intimate, social and political forms of life.

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