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Looking at Lexit: mission statement

Should Labour fight Brexit, or embrace it? Julian Sayarer and Xavier Buxton introduce a new project on openDemocracy, exploring the possibilities and limitations of “Lexit”.

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Many progressives want Corbyn’s Labour to fight back against Brexit. PAimages/Jonathan Brady. All rights reserved.

Brexit Migration Watch

What will happen mañana? Brexit and return migration of retirees from Spain
JORDI GINER-MONFORT
Post-facts, post-gains: the economics of labour migration after Brexit
ELISA MOSLER VIDAL
The rights and wrongs of the High Court ruling on triggering Article 50
ZAKI NAHABOO
The Labour Party, free movement and Brexit
OWEN PARKER
Brexit, the Commonwealth, and exclusionary citizenship
GURMINDER K. BHAMBRA
What will Brexit mean for asylum in the UK?
LUCY MAYBLIN

Brexit and the Economy

Business and trade after Brexit (series intro)
BENJAMIN MARTILL & UTA STAIGER

The economy after Brexit: encouragingly resilient or still a case of ‘wait and see’?
IAIN BEGG
The dominance of Brexonomics
DAVID SCHÄFER
The business of Brexit: how companies make decisions in uncertain political times
BRAD MCKAY
Four myths about Brexit and financial services
GUY SEARS
Brexit: Ireland stands to lose most
KATIE DAUGHEN
Read more...

My 350 on Brexit

The illusion of direct democracy
FRANCESCA AMMATURO
Liberal nationalism gives advance notice of its fascist form
MARCEL STOETZLER
But Rome wasn’t built in a day
LAURE CLAUDON
The poverty of our imagination
GIORGIO SHANI
On Friday morning, I woke up to be an immigrant
LAURA STAHNKE
‘Us’ versus ‘them’
AMANDA MACHIN
The carnival of uncertainty
DAVID BEER
Who is going to clean up the mess of the EU referendum?
FRANCESCA E.S. MONTEMAGGI
Read more...

Blimey it might be a Brexit!

The Brexit referendum changed Britain forever and perhaps Europe too. Week by week through the campaign Anthony Barnett wrote about its causes and significance. Download as a PDF

Table of Contents
  1. Introduction
  2. Thatcherism’s twin legacy defines the choice
  3. Must the left be skewered, process and content
  4. Dodgy Dave's referendum deal
  5. Would you believe it, Boris and Gove defy corporate fatalism
  6. It's a bad referendum, as Obama discovers
  7. Maddening times
  8. The curse of Brexit: the referendum claims its first scalp, Scottish Labour
  9. The European project is ours: roll up our sleeves for remain
  10. Labour's moribund referendum
  11. England's Brexit
  12. Let's Take Control! Brexit and sovereignty
  13. Death and the Referendum
  14. The referendum in Doncaster and Labour's disappearing trick
  15. Blimey it IS Brexit

 

Britain must accept ambiguity to survive Brexit

Theresa May and Brexiteers both insist on a damaging binary view of the UK and Europe.

Lexit: defeatism dressed as ambition

Lexiters are deluded: Brexit is a right-wing project. The future of the UK left is with the European left, in the international struggle. This piece, introducing our “Looking at Lexit” series, is paired with a “Lexit” argument by Xavier Buxton.

Lexit: looking forwards, not backwards

The EU is riddled with neoliberalism. Brexit has shattered the status quo, and presents an opportunity to the UK left. This piece, introducing our “Looking at Lexit” series, is paired with a “Lemain” argument by Julian Sayarer.

Looking at Lexit: mission statement

Should Labour fight Brexit, or embrace it? Julian Sayarer and Xavier Buxton introduce a new project on openDemocracy, exploring the possibilities and limitations of “Lexit”.

Brexit means…progressive alliances, or ‘corporate absolutism’?

The ‘Leave’ vote, however manipulated by the media, was not just a rejection of Brussels technocracy but of the political status quo at Westminster. It’s time to rewrite the constitutional and political rules from scratch.

The progressive priority: a social democratic Britain

The belief that the health of the British economy depends on trade policies with Europe or anywhere else comes directly from neoliberal ideology, that “openness”, globalization of trade and capital flows, bring prosperity.

Brexit makes labour exploitation more likely in the UK

Negotiations on a future Brexit deal have barely gotten started, yet EU workers across the UK are already finding themselves more vulnerable in the workplace.

No Bregrets: does Brexit hold hope for progressives after all?

Most UK progressives voted Remain, but the referendum result has brought about the welcome collapse of the Tory majority. Could Brexit under Labour provide a forward-looking social democracy?

Food, the UK and Brexit: an even messier reprise of Corn Laws politics?

We see Liam Fox warming up a US-UK trade deal, while Michael Gove assures consumers that animal welfare and food quality standards are safe in his hands. This doesn’t add up.

Single market maze contains clues to complex Brexit puzzle

While political debate over Brexit sidestepped the complexities of the single market, domestic volatility makes replicating trading arrangements much more difficult.

Why the UK’s hung parliament is an opportunity for constructive Europeans

The reality is that after this election any UK government will be a weak one: no matter whether the cabinet is led by Theresa May or Jeremy Corbyn. There are opportunities here.

The many Brexits of Bristol

Bristol strongly supported Remain but not all of its component parts did. Ward-level data reveals who voted for what, why, and thus how we might move forward as a community.

What will Brexit mean for the future of European student mobility?

The UK government's stance on immigration will likely cost British students their access to Erasmus+. How will UK universities keep their students thinking globally post-Brexit?

Bristol, Brexit and the creative challenge

Bristol’s creative industries give the city a strong starting point for taking the city global post-Brexit. But it will need support to succeed.

Restoring the Franco-German leadership of the EU

Britain for one is quite unprepared for the ultimate project of the new French president: the restoration of Franco-German leadership in Europe.

Brexit and unemployment: where bureaucracy becomes brutal

Receiving jobseeker’s allowance isn’t enough for EEA nationals to prove they are looking for work. But if that’s not sufficient, what is?

Brexit, Bristol and business

Business was never unified on its stance towards Brexit, and very few assessments have studied how it will affect local economies.Might Bristol be the place to start?

Making sense of Brexit: foreigners in defence of foreigners’ rights

There are a reported three million EU citizens and more than five million non-EU citizenships in Britain. Why aren’t they organising ahead of the election?

Neighbourhood responses to Brexit challenges

“Taking back control”, they said. If that means being active citizens and active listeners, there may be hope.

#BristolBrexit: a city responds to Brexit

Uncertainty is plaguing the transition to a post-Brexit Britain. Cities can, and must, address it head on in ways that work best for them.

If you're not yet radical, you haven't been paying attention

Raoul Martinez spoke this weekend at 'Brexit and the Political Crash', The Convention in London: “Beyond Brexit, Labour are offering one of the most progressive manifestos in living memory.” Keynote speech.

Brexit: a reinvigorated politics

Michael Gove spoke this week-end at 'Brexit and the Political Crash', The Convention in London: “For me, it was primarily about making sure that whoever exercises power over you, is someone that you can throw out.” Keynote speech.

Brexit: the British élitist revolution

Nick Clegg speaking at 'Brexit and the Political Crash', The Convention in London: “It is a curiously British élitist revolution and we need to understand what it is.” Keynote speech.

Why DiEMUK shouldn’t take a precise position on the Brexit negotiations: OR, why Britain is screwed

Let’s focus on the battles we want to win, not the ones we’ve already lost.

On the June 8 UK general election : a strong and credible opposition

Main proposition: DiEM25 UK should refrain from supporting any particular party at this point. It should focus instead on outlining specific approaches to the Brexit negotiation process.

Between mutation and marginalisation: the impending crisis of the centre-right in western democracies

The centre-right as a coherent set of principles is in serious danger of marginalization as political competition in western democracies realigns between closure and openness to the outside world.

Why French progressives should vote for Macron

The second round of the French presidential election is not about voting for the lesser of two evils. It’s about bringing progressives together to vote against evil itself. Español

Mission (im)possible? The British left and the future of Europe

A recent gathering of left-wing activists shows the idea of a reformed Europe is being quietly abandoned – but is this the group to trip up hard Brexit? 

Where do we go from here? Designing the future of Europe

The future is created. By us. The European Commission’s White Paper on the Future of Europe invites politicians and citizens alike to focus on what they want for the future. 

RIP United Kingdom, 1927-2017

The Tories maintain the electoral momentum and the political initiative, something which is not only going to damage Labour irreversibly, but the entire country, with Brexit negotiations breaking it apart.

From insecurity to insecurity: Black and Ethnic Minority Europeans in the UK

“If all the Europeans leave, who work so hard and they pay taxes, how are they going to manage to keep the benefit system in the first place?”

Brexit: yes, you will suffer as well

Bankrupt regions, impoverished hospitals, overcrowded prisons: Brexit will affect everybody in Europe. And yet nobody is taking responsibility for the mess.

Will Brexit spell the end of fishing quotas?

The Leave campaign promised that Brexit would help fishers ‘take back control’ of Britain’s fishing waters and stocks. But how quotas are allocated has always been a national decision.

Solidarity with Europe as 100,000 march on the UK parliament

European progressives are clear that the EU’s demise would spell disaster for its citizens, and yet, nothing short of a complete transformation can pull it back from the brink.

We've triggered Article 50. Is this such a tragedy for Europe?

It is now possible that new governments in France and Germany will respond to civil society pressure and do what is needed to change the EU, without being blocked by Britain.

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